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Imperialism, Colonialism and Collaboration in the Social Sciences

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  • Ruttan, Vernon W.

Abstract

Prior to the middle of the twentieth century the margins that have demarcated the subject matter of the several social sciences had been relatively stable since the latter decades of the nineteenth century. Since mid-century, however, a number of intellectual and institutional developments have conspired to call into question traditional disciplinary boundaries. In this paper I address the role of disciplinary imperialism, colonialism and collaboration in advancing social science knowledge about development processes and in the design of development policy and institutions. I conclude the paper with several case studies of collaboration across disciplines that have advanced knowledge and practice in the field of development.

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  • Ruttan, Vernon W., 2007. "Imperialism, Colonialism and Collaboration in the Social Sciences," Staff Papers 7356, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:umaesp:7356
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    6. Pardey, Philip G. & Christian, Jason E., 2002. "The production and diffusion of policy knowledge," Impact assessments 14, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Nash, John, 1950. "The Bargaining Problem," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 18(2), pages 155-162, April.
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    Keywords

    International Development;

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