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Before Implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act's Produce Rule: A Survey of U.S. Produce Growers

Author

Listed:
  • Astill, Gregory
  • Minor, Travis
  • Calvin, Linda
  • Thornsbury, Suzanne

Abstract

The 2011 Food Safety Modernization Act’s (FSMA) Produce Rule (PR)—formally known as the “Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption”—was the first on farm food safety regulation for produce to be consumed in the United States. It set specific disease-preventive requirements for produce that is sold and consumed raw. Teaming with U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) to conduct a two-part survey in 2015 and 2016, USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS) asked U.S. produce growers about microbial food safety practices already in place before the PR’s implementation. This report presents survey descriptive statistics covering various food safety practices and measured costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Astill, Gregory & Minor, Travis & Calvin, Linda & Thornsbury, Suzanne, 2018. "Before Implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act's Produce Rule: A Survey of U.S. Produce Growers," Economic Information Bulletin 276221, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersib:276221
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.276221
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    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/276221/files/EIB-194.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Calvin, Linda, 2004. "Response to U.S. Foodborne Illness Outbreaks Associated with Imported Produce," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33647, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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