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Analyzing Trends in Herbicide Use in Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Grabowski, Philip
  • Jayne, Thom

Abstract

Chemical weed control has been researched in Africa since the 1960s but adoption has been low or non-existent for decades. Recent evidence suggests that herbicide use in some parts of Africa is reaching significant levels and may be on the rise more generally. Little is known about which farmers are using herbicides in Africa and what factors drive their use. This study aims to document trends in herbicide use and analyze the drivers of those trends in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Grabowski, Philip & Jayne, Thom, 2016. "Analyzing Trends in Herbicide Use in Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Security International Development Working Papers 245909, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:245909
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/245909
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jayne, T. S. & Yamano, Takashi & Weber, Michael T. & Tschirley, David & Benfica, Rui & Chapoto, Antony & Zulu, Ballard, 2003. "Smallholder income and land distribution in Africa: implications for poverty reduction strategies," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 253-275, June.
    2. Erenstein, Olaf, 2006. "Intensification or extensification? Factors affecting technology use in peri-urban lowlands along an agro-ecological gradient in West Africa," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 90(1-3), pages 132-158, October.
    3. Goeb, Joseph, 2013. "Conservation Farming Adoption and Impact among First Year Adopters in Central Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 171872, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Tittonell, P. & van Wijk, M.T. & Rufino, M.C. & Vrugt, J.A. & Giller, K.E., 2007. "Analysing trade-offs in resource and labour allocation by smallholder farmers using inverse modelling techniques: A case-study from Kakamega district, western Kenya," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 95(1-3), pages 76-95, December.
    5. Jesusa C. Beltran & Benedict White & Michael Burton & Graeme J. Doole & David J. Pannell, 2013. "Determinants of herbicide use in rice production in the Philippines," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(1), pages 45-55, January.
    6. Ekboir, Javier M. & Boa, Kofi & Dankyi, A.A., 2002. "Impact Of No-Till Technologies In Ghana," Economics Program Papers 23721, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    7. Ragasa, Catherine & Dankyi, Awere & Acheampong, Patricia & Wiredu, Alexander Nimo & Chapoto, Antony & Asamoah, Marian & Tripp, Robert, 2013. "Patterns of adoption of improved maize technologies in Ghana:," GSSP working papers 36, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Ngeleza, Guyslain K. & Owusua, Rebecca & Jimah, Kipo & Kolavalli, Shashidhara, 2011. "Cropping practices and labor requirements in field operations for major crops in Ghana: What needs to be mechanized?," IFPRI discussion papers 1074, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Productivity Analysis;

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