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Patterns of adoption of improved rice technologies in Ghana:

Author

Listed:
  • Ragasa, Catherine
  • Dankyi, Awere
  • Acheampong, Patricia
  • Wiredu, Alexander Nimo
  • Chapoto, Antony
  • Asamoah, Marian
  • Tripp, Robert

Abstract

This study aims to provide up-to-date analysis using rarely collected nationwide data on the patterns of adoption of improved technologies for rice in Ghana.

Suggested Citation

  • Ragasa, Catherine & Dankyi, Awere & Acheampong, Patricia & Wiredu, Alexander Nimo & Chapoto, Antony & Asamoah, Marian & Tripp, Robert, 2013. "Patterns of adoption of improved rice technologies in Ghana:," GSSP working papers 35, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:gsspwp:35
    as

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    File URL: http://cdm15738.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getfile/collection/p15738coll2/id/127765/filename/127976.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Akramov, Kamiljon T. & Malek, Mehrab, 2012. "Analyzing profitability of maize, rice, and soybean production in Ghana: Results of PAM and DEA analysis," GSSP working papers 28, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Vondolia, Godwin Kofi & Eggert, Håkan & Stage, Jesper, "undated". "Nudging Boserup? The Impact of Fertilizer Subsidies on Investment in Soil and Water Conservation," Discussion Papers dp-12-08-efd, Resources For the Future.
    3. Ragasa, Catherine & Dankyi, Awere & Acheampong, Patricia & Wiredu, Alexander Nimo & Chapoto, Antony & Asamoah, Marian & Tripp, Robert, 2013. "Patterns of adoption of improved maize technologies in Ghana:," GSSP working papers 36, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Dalton, Timothy J. & Guei, Robert G., 2003. "Productivity Gains from Rice Genetic Enhancements in West Africa: Countries and Ecologies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 359-374, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    as


    Cited by:

    1. Douglas Gollin & David Lagakos & Michael E. Waugh, 2014. "Agricultural Productivity Differences across Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 165-170, May.
    2. repec:eee:agisys:v:159:y:2018:i:c:p:126-138 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Catherine Ragasa, 2016. "Organizational and Institutional Barriers to the Effectiveness of Public Expenditures: The Case of Agricultural Research Investments in Nigeria and Ghana," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 28(4), pages 660-689, September.
    4. Catherine Ragasa & Antony Chapoto, 2017. "Moving in the right direction? The role of price subsidies in fertilizer use and maize productivity in Ghana," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 9(2), pages 329-353, April.
    5. Rebecca Owusu Coffie & Michael P. Burton & Fiona L. Gibson & Atakelty Hailu, 2016. "Choice of Rice Production Practices in Ghana: A Comparison of Willingness to Pay and Preference Space Estimates," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(3), pages 799-819, September.
    6. Wiredu, Alexander Nimo & Zeller, Manfred & Diagne, Aliou, 0. "What Determines Adoption of Fertilizers among Rice-Producing Households in Northern Ghana?," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 54.
    7. Houssou, Nazaire & Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Silver, Jed, 2016. "Agricultural intensification, technology adoption, and institutions in Ghana:," GSSP policy notes 10, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Houssou, Nazaire & Chapoto, Anthony & Asante-Addo, Collins, 2016. "Farm transition and indigenous growth: The rise to medium- and large-scale farming in Ghana:," IFPRI discussion papers 1499, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Ragasa, Catherine & Chapoto, Anthony, 2016. "Limits to green revolution in rice in Africa: The case of Ghana:," IFPRI discussion papers 1561, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    rice; Agricultural productivity; crop yield; improved technology; improved seed; fertilizer use; Herbicides;

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