IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/midcwp/54477.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Many Paths of Cotton Sector Reform in Eastern and Southern Africa: Lessons From a Decade of Experience

Author

Listed:
  • Tschirley, David L.
  • Poulton, Colin
  • Boughton, Duncan

Abstract

With cotton sector reform in much of SSA a decade old, it is now possible to review the empirical record and begin drawing lessons from experience. This paper assesses the record of five countries in southern and eastern Africa: Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Mozambique. In four of these countries, cotton is the first- or second most important smallholder cash crop; only in Uganda does it substantially lag other cash crops. The focus on the course of reform in each – initial conditions, key elements of the reform, and institutional response to it – and attempt to draw lessons for policy makers, donors, and researchers. the paper begins by outlining the challenges faced by cotton production and marketing systems. Next a review the range of pre-reform institutional responses to these challenges, before discussing the reform process in each country and reviewing the evolving institutional response to it. Finally, assess the performance that each country has achieved and attempt to relate this to its initial conditions and subsequent institutional responses, and closing by outlining lessons for strategies to improve cotton systems in SSA.

Suggested Citation

  • Tschirley, David L. & Poulton, Colin & Boughton, Duncan, 2006. "The Many Paths of Cotton Sector Reform in Eastern and Southern Africa: Lessons From a Decade of Experience," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54477, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:54477
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/54477/files/wp_18.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Poulton, Colin & Gibbon, Peter & Hanyani-Mlambo, Benjamine & Kydd, Jonathan & Maro, Wilbald & Larsen, Marianne Nylandsted & Osorio, Afonso & Tschirley, David & Zulu, Ballard, 2004. "Competition and Coordination in Liberalized African Cotton Market Systems," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 519-536, March.
    2. Benfica, Rui M.S. & Tschirley, David L. & Sambo, Liria, 2002. "The Impact of Alternative Agro-Industrial Investments on Poverty Reduction in Rural Mozambique," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56055, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. D. Glover, 1990. "Contract Farming And Outgrower Schemes In East And Southern Africa," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(3), pages 303-315.
    4. Maumbe, Blessing M. & Swinton, Scott M., 2003. "Hidden health costs of pesticide use in Zimbabwe's smallholder cotton growers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 57(9), pages 1559-1571, November.
    5. Tschirley, David L. & Zulu, Ballard & Shaffer, James D., 2004. "Cotton in Zambia: An Assessment of its Organization, Performance, Current Policy Initiatives, and Challenges for the Future," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54467, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Hazell, Peter & Poulton, Colin & Wiggins, Steve & Dorward, Andrew, 2010. "The Future of Small Farms: Trajectories and Policy Priorities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 1349-1361, October.
    2. Christian K.M. Kingombe & Salvatore di Falco, 2012. "The Impact of a Feeder Road Project on Cash Crop Production in Zambia’s Eastern Province between 1997 and 2002, Labour Market and Fiscal Policy," IHEID Working Papers 04-2012, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies, revised 28 Feb 2012.
    3. Benfica, Rui M.S., 2007. "Income Poverty Effects of Expansion and Policies in Cash Cropping Economies in Rural Mozambique: An Economy-wide Approach," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56070, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Gouse, Marnus, 2013. "Socioeconomic and farm-level effects of genetically modified crops: The case of Bt crops in South Africa," IFPRI book chapters,in: Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Gruère, Guillaume P. & Sithole-Niang, Idah (ed.), Genetically modified crops in Africa: Economic and policy lessons from countries south of the Sahara, chapter 1, pages 25-41 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. David Tschirley & Colin Poulton & Patrick Labaste, 2009. "Organization and Performance of Cotton Sectors in Africa : Learning from Reform Experience," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2604, 05-2018.
    6. Benfica, Rui M.S., 2007. "Interlinked Transactions in Cash Cropping Economies: Rationale for Persistence, and the Determinants of Farmer Participation and Performance in the Zambezi Valley of Mozambique," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56069, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Crop Production/Industries;

    JEL classification:

    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:54477. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/damsuus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.