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Urbanization and Food Security: Empirical Evidence from Households in Urban Southwest Nigeria

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  • Okoruwa, V.
  • Ikudayisi, A.

Abstract

Abstract Rapid urban growth changes the composition as well as diversification of the food consumed among urban households. Achieving food security in the midst of rapid urbanization require understanding how urban and food consumption intertwined. Thus this paper uses combined measure of food security to determine urban household food security status as influenced by extent of urbanization in Nigeria. Results show that urban effect generated through urbanicity index using principal component analysis revealed that most households were in low urban category. On the average, most urban household had diverse diet. However, combining per capita expenditure and dietary diversity index as measure of household food security revealed different level of food security status. Multinomial logit regression results reveals that gender of household head, employment status, educational status, household income, occupational status and urbanicity index significantly determine the probability of urban household being food secured at different levels of food security status. Relevant policy interventions that aim at securing sustainable food security were identified. Keywords: Food security, Dietary diversity, Food expenditure, Urbanicity index, Urban Nigeria JEL classification code: D12, R22, C25, C38, Acknowledgement :

Suggested Citation

  • Okoruwa, V. & Ikudayisi, A., 2018. "Urbanization and Food Security: Empirical Evidence from Households in Urban Southwest Nigeria," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277053, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae18:277053
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/277053/files/756.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Van de Poel, Ellen & O'Donnell, Owen & Van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2009. "Urbanization and the spread of diseases of affluence in China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 200-216, July.
    2. Cockx, Lara & De Weerdt, Joachim, 2016. "From Corn to Popcorn? Urbanization and food consumption in Sub-Sahara Africa: Evidence from rural-urban migrants in Tanzania," 2016 Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 249270, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    3. repec:spr:agfoec:v:5:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40100-017-0076-y is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Deon Filmer & Lant Pritchett, 2001. "Estimating Wealth Effects Without Expenditure Data—Or Tears: An Application To Educational Enrollments In States Of India," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(1), pages 115-132, February.
    5. Akerele, Dare & Odeiyi, Kehinde, 2015. "Demand for Diverse Diets: Evidence from Nigeria," 89th Annual Conference, April 13-15, 2015, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 204210, Agricultural Economics Society.
    6. Pangaribowo, Evita Hanie & Gerber, Nicolas & Torero, Maximo, 2013. "Food and Nutrition Security Indicators: A Review," Working Papers 147911, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    7. Emiliano Magrini & Mauro Vigani, 2016. "Technology adoption and the multiple dimensions of food security: the case of maize in Tanzania," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(4), pages 707-726, August.
    8. Dahly, Darren L. & Adair, Linda S., 2007. "Quantifying the urban environment: A scale measure of urbanicity outperforms the urban-rural dichotomy," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(7), pages 1407-1419, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food Security and Poverty;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • R22 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Other Demand
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C38 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Classification Methdos; Cluster Analysis; Principal Components; Factor Analysis

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