IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/iaae15/211399.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Information based food policy: is nutritional label the right instrument for everyone?

Author

Listed:
  • Cavaliere, Alessia
  • De Marchi, Elisa
  • Banterle, Alessandro

Abstract

Individuals’ time preference is an important driver for several health-related behaviors, but there is still lack of knowledge about its relationship with specific food-related behaviors. In this paper we investigate if time preference may have a role in affecting consumers’ use of food label. The data were collected through a face-to-face survey on a sample of 540 Italian consumers. Time preference was estimated through an index including BMI, smoking behavior and physical activity. The analysis was made estimating a set of three equations. The results confirm our hypothesis that individuals with low time preference, who give more importance to future health outcomes, are more willing to use such information.

Suggested Citation

  • Cavaliere, Alessia & De Marchi, Elisa & Banterle, Alessandro, 2015. "Information based food policy: is nutritional label the right instrument for everyone?," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211399, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:211399
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.211399
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/211399/files/Cavaliere%20DeMArchi%20Banterle_2015.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Smith, Patricia K. & Bogin, Barry & Bishai, David, 2005. "Are time preference and body mass index associated?: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 259-270, July.
    2. Lydia Lawless & Andreas Drichoutis & Rodolfo Nayga, 2013. "Time preferences and health behaviour: a review," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-19, December.
    3. Chang, Hung-Hao & Nayga Jr., Rodolfo M., 2011. "Mother's nutritional label use and children's body weight," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 171-178, April.
    4. Heather Brown & Marjon Pol, 2014. "The Role Of Time Preferences In The Intergenerational Transfer Of Smoking," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(12), pages 1493-1501, December.
    5. Odelia Rosin, 2008. "The Economic Causes Of Obesity: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(4), pages 617-647, September.
    6. Grossman, Michael, 2006. "Education and Nonmarket Outcomes," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    7. McLean-Meyinsse, Patricia E., 2001. "An Analysis Of Nutritional Label Use In The Southern United States," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 32(1), pages 1-5, March.
    8. Jayachandran N. Variyam, 2008. "Do nutrition labels improve dietary outcomes?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(6), pages 695-708.
    9. Andreas C. Drichoutis & Panagiotis Lazaridis & Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr, 2009. "On Consumers' Valuation Of Nutrition Information," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 223-247, July.
    10. Andreas C. Drichoutis & Panagiotis Lazaridis & Rodolfo M. Nayga, 2005. "Nutrition knowledge and consumer use of nutritional food labels," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 32(1), pages 93-118, March.
    11. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-255, March-Apr.
    12. Barreiro-Hurlé, Jesús & Gracia, Azucena & de-Magistris, Tiziana, 2010. "Does nutrition information on food products lead to healthier food choices?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 221-229, June.
    13. repec:spr:agfoec:v:1:y:2013:i:1:p:1-19 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Andreas Drichoutis & Panagiotis Lazaridis & Rodolfo Nayga & Maria Kapsokefalou & George Chryssochoidis, 2008. "A theoretical and empirical investigation of nutritional label use," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 9(3), pages 293-304, August.
    15. Maria L. Loureiro & Steven T. Yen & Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr, 2012. "The effects of nutritional labels on obesity," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 43(3), pages 333-342, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:211399. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iaaeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.