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Options to improve food security in North Africa: CGE modelling of deeper trade and investment integration with the European Union

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Listed:
  • Boulanger, Pierre
  • Kavallari, Aikaterini
  • M'barek, Robert
  • Rau, Marie Luise
  • Rutten, Martine

Abstract

This paper presents some macro and food security impacts of deeper economic integration between the European Union and three North African countries, namely Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. It conducts a quantitative impact assessment of increase in trade and investment flows using the Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET). Trade liberalization enhances food security by counteracting the rise in food prices, fostered by growing demand for agricultural products in North Africa. Investments either on the whole economy or targeted to cutting down losses (waste) in food production are modelled. Results suggest that economic growth is stimulated mostly by widespread productivity gains (not restricted to agri-food sector) and boosted by trade integration through removal of non-tariff measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Boulanger, Pierre & Kavallari, Aikaterini & M'barek, Robert & Rau, Marie Luise & Rutten, Martine, 2015. "Options to improve food security in North Africa: CGE modelling of deeper trade and investment integration with the European Union," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211366, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:211366
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.211366
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/211366/files/Boulanger-Options%20to%20improve%20food%20security%20in%20North%20Africa%20A%20CGE%20modelling-297.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Goetz, Linde & Grethe, Harald, 2009. "The EU entry price system for fresh fruits and vegetables - Paper tiger or powerful market barrier?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 81-93, February.
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    5. Aikaterini Kavallari & Marie-Luise Rau & Martine Rutten, 2013. "Economic Growth in the Euro-Med Area through Trade Integration: Focus on Agriculture and Food. Regional impact analysis," JRC Working Papers JRC84800, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
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    10. Hertel, Thomas, 1997. "Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and applications," GTAP Books, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, number 7685.
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    Keywords

    Food Security and Poverty;

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