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China’s Agricultural Modernisation Program: an assessment of its sustainability and impacts in the case of the high-value beef chain

  • Waldron, Scott A.
  • Brown, Colin G.
  • Longworth, John W.
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    China has embarked on a major program to modernise agricultural and agribusiness structures with far reaching implications for rural development, international competitiveness / trade and food safety. There are, however, few studies that examine in detail how the modernisation program has proceeded, its’ sustainability and impacts. This paper aims to provide such as assessment through a series of integrated budget analyses of participants in the modern, high value beef chain. The paper concludes that rather than attempting to skip development phases by fast-tracking the development of modern structures in high-value agrifood chains, China should pursue a more incremental and facilitative approach based around developing structures in mid-value agrifood chains.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/50784
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    Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China with number 50784.

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    Date of creation: 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae09:50784
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.iaae-agecon.org/
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    1. Pingali, Prabhu, 2007. "Westernization of Asian diets and the transformation of food systems: Implications for research and policy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 281-298, June.
    2. Wang, Zhigang & Mao, Yanna & Gale, Fred, 2008. "Chinese consumer demand for food safety attributes in milk products," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 27-36, February.
    3. Hartwig de Haen & Kostas Stamoulis & Prakash Shetty & Prabhu Pingali, 2003. "The World Food Economy in the Twenty-first Century: Challenges for International Co-operation," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 21(5-6), pages 683-696, December.
    4. Hongdong Guo & Robert W Jolly & Jianhua Zhu, 2007. "Contract Farming in China: Perspectives of Farm Households and Agribusiness Firms," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 49(2), pages 285-312, June.
    5. Ma, Hengyun & Huang, Jikun & Fuller, Frank H. & Rozelle, Scott, 2006. "Getting Rich and Eating Out: Consumption of Food Away from Home in Urban China," Staff General Research Papers 12499, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Brown, Colin G. & Longworth, John W. & Waldron, Scott, 2002. "Food safety and development of the beef industry in China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 269-284, June.
    7. Gale, H. Frederick, Jr. & Huang, Kuo S., 2007. "Demand For Food Quantity And Quality In China," Economic Research Report 7252, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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