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Contributions of Social Capital Theory in Predicting Collective Action Behavior among Livestock Keeping Communities in Kenya

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  • Ouma, Emily Awuor
  • Abdulai, Awudu

Abstract

Social capital and collective action initiatives provide important avenues for access and uptake of improved livestock technologies through communal breeding programs among resource poor communities in developing countries. This study examines the factors that influence collective action behavior in crop-livestock and pastoralist production systems in Kenya by employing a binary logit model. The results show that age, gender of household members and education level of the household head exert significant influence on the decision to take up collective action. In addition, wealthy households are less likely to participate in collective action initiatives compared to the resource constrained. These results suggest that policies that encourage group formation may be effective in targeting improvement in livelihoods of poor populations through access to improved livestock.

Suggested Citation

  • Ouma, Emily Awuor & Abdulai, Awudu, 2009. "Contributions of Social Capital Theory in Predicting Collective Action Behavior among Livestock Keeping Communities in Kenya," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 49994, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae09:49994
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/49994
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Masako Fujiie & Yujiro Hayami & Masao Kikuchi, 2005. "The conditions of collective action for local commons management: the case of irrigation in the Philippines," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 33(2), pages 179-189, September.
    2. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & DiGregorio, Monica & McCarthy, Nancy, 2004. "Methods for studying collective action in rural development," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 82(3), pages 197-214, December.
    3. Isabelle Huault & V. Perret & S. Charreire-Petit, 2007. "Management," Post-Print halshs-00337676, HAL.
    4. Wollny, Clemens B. A., 2003. "The need to conserve farm animal genetic resources in Africa: should policy makers be concerned?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 341-351, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fischer, Elisabeth & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "Smallholder Farmers and Collective Action: What Determines the Intensity of Participation?," Discussion Papers 108551, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    2. Fischer, Elisabeth & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "Smallholder Farmers and Collective Action: What Determines the Intensity of Participation?," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 28, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.

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