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The Impact of Social Capital on Farm and Household Income: Results of a Survey among Individual Farmers in Poland

  • Wolz, Axel
  • Fritzsch, Jana
  • Reinsberg, Klaus

Private farming is the dominant mode of agricultural production in most European countries. Not all farmers are equally successful, economically. In this paper it is analysed whether social capital is an important factor contributing to higher agricultural incomes. Based on the findings of a farm survey in Poland among 410 farmers by adopting factor and multiple regression analysis it can be deduced that social capital is indeed a significant factor determining the level of agricultural income. However, its impact not that clear-cut as anticipated. More in-depth analysis will be needed in the future.

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Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 94th Seminar, April 9-10, 2005, Ashford, UK with number 24442.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae94:24442
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  1. Scott Rozelle & Johan F.M. Swinnen, 2004. "Success and Failure of Reform: Insights from the Transition of Agriculture," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(2), pages 404-456, June.
  2. Chloupkova, Jarka, 2002. "Czech Agricultural Sector: Organisational Structure and Its Transformation," Unit of Economics Working papers 24195, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Food and Resource Economic Institute.
  3. repec:ebd:wpaper:61 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Winters, Paul C. & Davis, Benjamin & Corral, Leonardo, 2001. "Assets, Activities and Income Generation in Rural Mexico: Factoring in Social and Public Capital," Working Papers 12898, University of New England, School of Economics.
  5. Joel Sobel, 2002. "Can We Trust Social Capital?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 139-154, March.
  6. Paldam, Martin & Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard, 2000. "An essay on social capital: looking for the fire behind the smoke," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 339-366, June.
  7. Petrick, Martin, 2001. "Documentation of the Poland farm survey 2000," IAMO Discussion Papers 36, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Central and Eastern Europe (IAMO).
  8. Winters, Paul & Davis, Benjamin & Corral, Leonardo, 2002. "Assets, activities and income generation in rural Mexico: factoring in social and public capital," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 27(2), August.
  9. Steven N. Durlauf, 2002. "Symposium on Social Capital: Introduction," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 417-418, November.
  10. Productivity Commission, 2003. "Social capital: reviewing the concept and its policy implications," Public Economics 0307001, EconWPA.
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