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The Generational Turnover in Agriculture: Theoretical Problems and Empirical Evidences

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  • Simeone, Mariarosaria

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to understand the causes determining the exit from the sector of young adults. Drawing from migration and succession theories, a number of factors, hypothesised to influence the decision, are tested using a Probit model. The findings lend support for the selectivity hypothesis: low incomes are negatively related with the propensity to stay in the sector. The exit of young could be related to the low earnings and to the preferences of individuals. The intergenerational transfer seems to be the result of an involvement in the farm activity.

Suggested Citation

  • Simeone, Mariarosaria, 2005. "The Generational Turnover in Agriculture: Theoretical Problems and Empirical Evidences," 94th Seminar, April 9-10, 2005, Ashford, UK 24434, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae94:24434
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/24434
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pesquin, Claudio & Kimhi, Ayal & Kislev, Yoav, 1999. "Old Age Security and Inter-Generational Transfer of Family Farms," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 19-37, March.
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    6. Ayal Kimhi & Noga Nachlieli, 2001. "Intergenerational Succession on Israeli Family Farms," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 42-58.
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    9. Mitch Renkow & Dale Hoover, 2000. "Commuting, Migration, and Rural-Urban Population Dynamics," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 261-287.
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    12. Costa, Dora L, 1998. "The Evolution of Retirement: Summary of a Research Project," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 232-236, May.
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