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The Generational Turnover in Agriculture: Theoretical Problems and Empirical Evidences

  • Simeone, Mariarosaria
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    The purpose of this study is to understand the causes determining the exit from the sector of young adults. Drawing from migration and succession theories, a number of factors, hypothesised to influence the decision, are tested using a Probit model. The findings lend support for the selectivity hypothesis: low incomes are negatively related with the propensity to stay in the sector. The exit of young could be related to the low earnings and to the preferences of individuals. The intergenerational transfer seems to be the result of an involvement in the farm activity.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/24434
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    Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 94th Seminar, April 9-10, 2005, Ashford, UK with number 24434.

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    Date of creation: 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae94:24434
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.eaae.org
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    1. Costa, Dora L, 1998. "The Evolution of Retirement: Summary of a Research Project," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 232-36, May.
    2. Micha Gisser & Alberto D�vila, 1998. "Do Farm Workers Earn Less? An Analysis of the Farm Labor Problem," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(4), pages 669-682.
    3. Chan, Sewin & Stevens, Ann Huff, 2004. "Do changes in pension incentives affect retirement? A longitudinal study of subjective retirement expectations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1307-1333, July.
    4. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1979. "An Equilibrium Theory of the Distribution of Income and Intergenerational Mobility," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1153-89, December.
    5. Ayal Kimhi & Noga Nachlieli, 2001. "Intergenerational Succession on Israeli Family Farms," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 42-58.
    6. Pesquin, Claudio & Kimhi, Ayal & Kislev, Yoav, 1999. "Old Age Security and Inter-Generational Transfer of Family Farms," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 19-37, March.
    7. Glauben, Thomas & Tietje, Hendrik & Weiss, Christoph R., 2002. "Intergenerational Successionon Family Farms: Evidence from Survey Data," FE Working Papers 0202, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Food Economics and Consumption Studies.
    8. Mitch Renkow, 2003. "Employment Growth, Worker Mobility, and Rural Economic Development," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(2), pages 503-513.
    9. Ayal Kimhi, 2000. "Is Part-Time Farming Really a Step in the Way Out of Agricultural?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(1), pages 38-48.
    10. Mitch Renkow & Dale Hoover, 2000. "Commuting, Migration, and Rural-Urban Population Dynamics," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 261-287.
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