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Workplace-anchored migration in US counties

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  • Han, Yicheol
  • Goetz, Stephan J.

Abstract

Residential amenities and access to employment are major factors in migration decisions. Yet traditional migration models are unable to reveal the causes (and effects) of migration because current data capture only movers who change their place of residence; depending on how far they move, these migrants may or may not also change their jobs. Migration flows thus could be categorized into two groups depending on whether the migrants also change their workplace. In this paper, we identify the number of movers who do and do not change their workplace by using overlapping county-to-county migration and commuting data. We refer to this as workplace-anchored and unanchored migration. Then we compare the local factors that affect both types of migration. Our analysis reveals that the most important local factors that separate workplace-anchored and unanchored migration are the poverty rate, commuting time, and age demographics of the origin and destination counties.

Suggested Citation

  • Han, Yicheol & Goetz, Stephan J., 2015. "Workplace-anchored migration in US counties," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 204952, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea15:204952
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/204952
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark D. Partridge & M. Rose Olfert, 2011. "The Winners' Choice: Sustainable Economic Strategies for Successful 21st-Century Regions," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 33(2), pages 143-178.
    2. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S. & Olfert, M. Rose & Ali, Kamar, 2012. "Dwindling U.S. internal migration: Evidence of spatial equilibrium or structural shifts in local labor markets?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 375-388.
    3. Rupasingha, Anil & Goetz, Stephan J., 2004. "County Amenities and Net Migration," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 33(2), October.
    4. Chen, Yong & Rosenthal, Stuart S., 2008. "Local amenities and life-cycle migration: Do people move for jobs or fun?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 519-537, November.
    5. Yicheol Han & Stephan J. Goetz & Taegon Kim & JeongJae Lee, 2013. "Estimating Employment-Related Migration from Overlapping Migration and Commuting Networks," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(3), pages 474-493, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; commuting; residential amenities; Community/Rural/Urban Development;

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