IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/aaea13/155282.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Access versus Choice: testing the “food desert” construct in Champaign, IL

Author

Listed:
  • Jerch, Rhiannon L.
  • Baylis, Katherine R.
  • Dissanayake, Sahan T. M.

Abstract

How does one’s food environment affect food purchase decisions? Food access has received significant political and academic attention, particularly under the Obama administration. Existing literature on food access and “food deserts” mainly focuses on geographic distance or the retail of fresh fruits & vegetables versus fast food within a neighborhood to determine and identify inequitable access. In this paper I attempt to develop an endogenous measure of food access by asking how geographic placement of food retail affects food expenditure, particularly of fruits & vegetables. I use novel data on 886 households matched to food prices from a census of geocoded food retailers in Champaign County to approach this question from two perspectives. I first estimate the household’s share of grocery expenditures allocated to fresh, frozen, and canned fruits & vegetables versus other grocery items. I then use data on a person’s residence and geocoded data on food retail locations in Champaign County to test for relationships between retailer proximity, and the share of expenditure on fruits & vegetables. The next perspective uses a choice experiment to measure the tradeoff among store characteristics that determine where a consumer shops. The demand estimation reveals how much fruits & vegetables a person is actually consuming, while the choice experiment reveals whether that individual is constrained in their consumption by their existing characteristic set of stores. I find that while proximity to a grocery store is positively correlated with healthier food consumption, policy response should focus on improving store quality and product quality to induce behavioral change. I further find policy response should be cognizant of endogenous locational sorting which may require alternative means to improve health other than changing the food geography.

Suggested Citation

  • Jerch, Rhiannon L. & Baylis, Katherine R. & Dissanayake, Sahan T. M., 2013. "Access versus Choice: testing the “food desert” construct in Champaign, IL," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 155282, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:155282
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/155282
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2009.187567_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Ming-Feng Hsieh & Kyle W. Stiegert, 2012. "Store Format Choice in Organic Food Consumption," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 94(2), pages 307-313.
    3. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2008.151415_8 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Food Security and Poverty;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:155282. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aaeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.