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Peer Pressure: Refereed Journals And Empirical Research In The Undergraduate Economics Curriculum

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  • Santos, Joseph M.

Abstract

Sharing with our students what we do as economists and how we do it can augment student learning in fundamental and interrelated ways. In particular, students learn to think like economists; to gain "information literacy;" to explain and synthesize their ideas clearly; and to engage themselves in the learning process. In this paper, I propose a curriculum to teach students how to access, chart and interpret macroeconomic data; to search and access peer-reviewed journal articles; and to formulate, in writing, positions on myriad economic issues, using empirical evidence and the extant academic literature to substantiate their positions. An assessment of the curriculum, which I instituted in fall 2001, demonstrated that students who participated were generally able to determine the extent of information needed to complete an empirical research prompt as well as to access and use the information effectively, efficiently and ethically. Moreover, most students could distinguish between general periodicals and scholarly journals.

Suggested Citation

  • Santos, Joseph M., 2002. "Peer Pressure: Refereed Journals And Empirical Research In The Undergraduate Economics Curriculum," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19854, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea02:19854
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Colander, David, 2003. "The Aging of an Economist," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(02), pages 157-176, June.
    2. William E. Becker & William H. Greene, 2001. "Teaching Statistics and Econometrics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 169-182, Fall.
    3. K. A. Frezel & D. J. McCready, 1983. "Introductory Economics Texts: A Conflict Between What Economists Do and Teach?," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 111-117, Apr-Jun.
    4. Ben S. Bernanke & Frederic S. Mishkin, 1997. "Inflation Targeting: A New Framework for Monetary Policy?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 97-116, Spring.
    5. John B. Taylor, 1995. "The Monetary Transmission Mechanism: An Empirical Framework," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 11-26, Fall.
    6. William E. Becker, 1997. "Teaching Economics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1347-1373, September.
    7. Rajshree Agarwal & A. Edward Day, 1998. "The Impact of the Internet on Economic Education," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(2), pages 99-110, June.
    8. William E. Becker, 2000. "Teaching Economics in the 21st Century," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(1), pages 109-119, Winter.
    9. Becker, William E & Watts, Michael, 1996. "Chalk and Talk: A National Survey on Teaching Undergraduate Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 448-453, May.
    10. Joseph Santos, 2002. "Developing and Implementing an Internet-Based Financial System Simulation Game," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(1), pages 31-40, January.
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