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Assessing the Efficacy of Gaming in Economic Education


  • Hans Gremmen
  • Jan Potters


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  • Hans Gremmen & Jan Potters, 1997. "Assessing the Efficacy of Gaming in Economic Education," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 291-303, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:28:y:1997:i:4:p:291-303 DOI: 10.1080/00220489709597934

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Watts, Michael & Bosshardt, William, 1991. "How Instructors Make a Difference: Panel Data Estimates from Principles of Economic Courses," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(2), pages 336-340, May.
    2. Watts, Michael & Lynch, Gerald J, 1989. "The Principles Courses Revisited," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 236-241, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Humberto Llavador & Marcus Giamattei, 2017. "Teaching microeconomic principles with smartphones – lessons from classroom experiments with classEx," Economics Working Papers 1584, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    2. Arnaud Buchs & Odile Blanchard, 2011. "Exploring the Concept of Sustainable Development Through Role-Playing," Post-Print halshs-00630990, HAL.
    3. Odile Blanchard & Arnaud Buchs, 2014. "Teaching Sustainable Development Issues: An Assessment of the Learning Effectiveness of Gaming," Working Papers halshs-00946227, HAL.
    4. Joshua D. Miller & Robert P. Rebelein, 2011. "Research on the Effectiveness of Non-Traditional Pedagogies," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 30 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Geert B. Woltjer, 2005. "Decisions and Macroeconomics: Development and Implementation of a Simulation Game," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 139-144, April.
    6. Popp, Jennie S. Hughes, 2002. "Impacts Of University Financial And Academic Support On Student Performance At The Ss-Aaea Quizbowl Competition And In The Classroom," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19836, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    7. Odile Blanchard & Arnaud Buchs, 2015. "Clarifying Sustainable Development Concepts Through Role playing," Post-Print hal-01103915, HAL.
    8. Martin Dufwenberg & J. Todd Swarthout, 2009. "Play to Learn? An Experiment," Experimental Economics Center Working Paper Series 2009-08, Experimental Economics Center, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    9. Gerald Eisenkopf & Pascal Sulser, 2013. "A Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2013-17, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    10. Popp, Jennie S. Hughes, 2004. "The Ss-Aaea Quizbowl: Success In And Out Of The Classroom A Three Year Study," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20119, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    11. Jongeneel, Roelof A. & Koning, Niek, 2005. "Teaching Agricultural Policy Using Games: The Agripol Game," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24773, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    12. Constanta-Nicoleta Bodea & Radu Ioan Mogos & Maria-Iuliana Dascalu & Augustin Purnus, 2015. "Simulation-Based E-Learning Framework for Entrepreneurship Education and Training," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 17(38), pages 1-10, February.
    13. Tisha Emerson & Denise Hazlett, 2011. "Classroom Experiments," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    14. Yvonne Durham & Thomas Mckinnon & Craig Schulman, 2007. "Classroom Experiments: Not Just Fun And Games," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(1), pages 162-178, January.
    15. Peter Navarro, 2015. "How Economics Faculty Can Survive (and Perhaps Thrive) in a Brave New Online World," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 155-176, Fall.
    16. Ninos P. Malek & Joshua C. Hall & Collin Hodges, 2014. "A Review and Analysis of the Effectiveness of Alternative Teaching Methods on Student Learning in Economics," Working Papers 14-27, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

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