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Teaching Statistics and Econometrics to Undergraduates

Author

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  • William E. Becker
  • William H. Greene

Abstract

Traditionally econometrics and economics statistics have been taught in the theory and proof, chalk and talk mode commonly found in the teaching of mathematics. We advance the use of computer technology in the teaching of quantitative methods to get students actively engaged in the learning process. We also assert that the essential tasks for those who teach these courses are to identify important issues that lend themselves to quantitative analyses and then to help students develop an understanding of the appropriate key concepts for those analyses.

Suggested Citation

  • William E. Becker & William H. Greene, 2001. "Teaching Statistics and Econometrics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 169-182, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:15:y:2001:i:4:p:169-182
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.15.4.169
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.15.4.169
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Donald S. Kenkel & Joseph V. Terza, 2001. "The effect of physician advice on alcohol consumption: count regression with an endogenous treatment effect," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 165-184.
    2. Michael P. Murray, 1999. "Econometrics Lectures in a Computer Classroom," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 308-321, January.
    3. Nalebuff, Barry, 1987. "Choose a Curtain, Duel-ity, Two Point Conversions, and More," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 157-163, Fall.
    4. Peter Hans Matthews, 2001. "Positive Feedback and Path Dependence Using the Law of Large Numbers," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 124-136, January.
    5. Friedman, Milton, 1992. "Do Old Fallacies Ever Die?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 2129-2132, December.
    6. Peter E. Kennedy, 2001. "Bootstrapping Student Understanding of What is Going on in Econometrics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 110-123, January.
    7. William E. Becker, 1997. "Teaching Economics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1347-1373, September.
    8. Becker, William E, 1987. "Teaching Statistical Methods to Undergraduate Economics Students," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(2), pages 18-23, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:taf:oaefxx:v:3:y:2015:i:1:p:1115618 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2017. "Undergraduate Econometrics Instruction: Through Our Classes, Darkly," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 31(2), pages 125-144, Spring.
    3. Santos, Joseph M., 2002. "Peer Pressure: Refereed Journals And Empirical Research In The Undergraduate Economics Curriculum," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19854, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Jeffrey J. Green & Courtenay C. Stone & Abera Zegeye & Thomas A. Charles, 2008. "How Much Math Do Students Need to Succeed in Business and Economics Statistics? An Ordered Probit Analysis," Working Papers 200802, Ball State University, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2008.
    5. Daniel Lass & Bernard Morzuch & Richard Rogers, 2007. "Teaching with Technology to Engage Students and Enhance Learning," Working Papers 2007-1, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Resource Economics.
    6. Geetha Rajaram, 2011. "Teaching Econometrics Using Formative Assessment," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 11(1), pages 1-12, Summer.
    7. Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2011. "Teaching Undergraduate Econometrics," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 43 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Jeffrey J. Green & Courtenay C. Stone & Abera Zegeye & Thomas A. Charles, 2007. "Changes in Math Prerequisites and Student Performance in Business Statistics: Do Math Prerequisites Really Matter?," Working Papers 200704, Ball State University, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2007.
    9. Geetha Rajaram, 2011. "Teaching Econometrics Using Formative Assessment," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 11(2), pages 1-12, Fall.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate

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