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Changes in Math Prerequisites and Student Performance in Business Statistics: Do Math Prerequisites Really Matter?

Author

Listed:
  • Jeffrey J. Green

    () (Department of Economics, Ball State University)

  • Courtenay C. Stone

    () (Department of Economics, Ball State University)

  • Abera Zegeye

    () (Department of Economics, Ball State University)

  • Thomas A. Charles

    () (Department of Economics, Ball State University)

Abstract

We use a binary probit model to assess the impact of several changes in math prerequisites on student performance in an undergraduate business statistics course. While the initial prerequisites did not necessarily provide students with the necessary math skills, our study, the first to examine the effect of math prerequisite changes, shows that these changes were deleterious to student performance. Our results helped convince the College of Business to change the math prerequisite again beginning with the 2008/2009 academic year. Thus, this study is also the first to actually help strengthen math prerequisites and improve student performance in business statistics.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey J. Green & Courtenay C. Stone & Abera Zegeye & Thomas A. Charles, 2007. "Changes in Math Prerequisites and Student Performance in Business Statistics: Do Math Prerequisites Really Matter?," Working Papers 200704, Ball State University, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:bsu:wpaper:200704
    as

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    File URL: http://web.bsu.edu/cob/econ/research/papers/bsuecwp200704green.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2007
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. J. S. Butler & T. Aldrich Finegan & John J. Siegfried, 1998. "Does more calculus improve student learning in intermediate micro- and macroeconomic theory?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(2), pages 185-202.
    2. Randall Krieg & Bulent Uyar, 2001. "Student performance in business and economics statistics: Does exam structure matter?," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 25(2), pages 229-241, June.
    3. Richard H. Mattoon, 2007. "Can higher education foster economic growth?—a conference summary," Chicago Fed Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Mar.
    4. William E. Becker & William H. Greene, 2001. "Teaching Statistics and Econometrics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 169-182, Fall.
    5. Charles L. Ballard & Marianne F. Johnson, 2004. "Basic Math Skills and Performance in an Introductory Economics Class," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 3-23, January.
    6. Becker, William E, 1998. "Engaging Students in Quantitative Analysis with Short Case Examples from the Academic and Popular Press," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 480-486, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Keywords

    binary probit; business statistics; math prerequisites; student performance.;

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