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Decentralized Trade, Random Utility and the Evolution of Social Welfare

Author

Listed:
  • Michihiro Kandori

    () (Department of Economics, University of Tokyo)

  • Roberto Serrano

    () (Department of Economics, Brown University)

  • Oscar Volij

    () (Department of Economics, Iowa State University)

Abstract

We study decentralized trade processes in general exchange economies and house allocation problems with and without money. Such processes are subject to persistent random shocks stemming from agents’ maximization of random utility. By imposing structure on the utility noise term —logit distribution—, one is able to calculate exactly the stationary distribution of the perturbed Markov process for any level of noise. We show that the stationary distribution places the largest probability on the maximizer of several social welfare functions in different variants of the model.

Suggested Citation

  • Michihiro Kandori & Roberto Serrano & Oscar Volij, 2004. "Decentralized Trade, Random Utility and the Evolution of Social Welfare," Economics Working Papers 0042, Institute for Advanced Study, School of Social Science.
  • Handle: RePEc:ads:wpaper:0042
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kandori, Michihiro & Serrano, Roberto & Volij, Oscar, 2008. "Decentralized trade, random utility and the evolution of social welfare," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 328-338, May.
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    4. Ben-Shoham, Assaf & Serrano, Roberto & Volij, Oscar, 2004. "The evolution of exchange," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 114(2), pages 310-328, February.
    5. Roberto Serrano & Oscar Volij, 2008. "Mistakes in Cooperation: the Stochastic Stability of Edgeworth's Recontracting," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(532), pages 1719-1741, October.
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    9. Lawrence Blume, 1996. "Population Games," Game Theory and Information 9607001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Kandori, Michihiro & Mailath, George J & Rob, Rafael, 1993. "Learning, Mutation, and Long Run Equilibria in Games," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 29-56, January.
    11. Alvin E Roth, 2008. "Axiomatic Models of Bargaining," Levine's Working Paper Archive 122247000000002376, David K. Levine.
    12. Blume Lawrence E., 1993. "The Statistical Mechanics of Strategic Interaction," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 387-424, July.
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    14. Young, H Peyton, 1993. "The Evolution of Conventions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 57-84, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chongmin Kim & Kam-Chau Wong, 2011. "Evolution of Walrasian equilibrium in an exchange economy," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 619-647, October.
    2. Zhiwei Cui & Yan-An Hwang, 2017. "House exchange and residential segregation in networks," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, vol. 46(1), pages 125-147, March.
    3. Vipul Bhatt & Masao Ogaki & Yuichi Yaguchi, 2015. "Normative Behavioural Economics Based on Unconditional Love and Moral Virtue," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 66(2), pages 226-246, June.
    4. Sylvain Barde, 2009. "The Google thought experiment: rationality, information and equilibrium in an exchange economy," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2009-34, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    5. Kandori, Michihiro & Serrano, Roberto & Volij, Oscar, 2008. "Decentralized trade, random utility and the evolution of social welfare," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 328-338, May.
    6. Ghosal, Sayantan & Porter, James, 2013. "Decentralised exchange, out-of-equilibrium dynamics and convergence to efficiency," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 1-21.
    7. Roland Pongou & Roberto Serrano, 2009. "A Dynamic Theory of Fidelity Networks with an Application to the Spread of HIV / AIDS," Working Papers wp2009_0909, CEMFI.
    8. Kevin Hasker, 2014. "The Emergent Seed: A Representation Theorem for Models of Stochastic Evolution and two formulas for Waiting Time," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000000954, David K. Levine.
    9. Sawa, Ryoji, 2014. "Coalitional stochastic stability in games, networks and markets," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 90-111.
    10. Roberto Serrano & Oscar Volij, 2008. "Mistakes in Cooperation: the Stochastic Stability of Edgeworth's Recontracting," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(532), pages 1719-1741, October.
    11. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/eu4vqp9ompqllr09hc01g3029 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Accinelli, Elvio & Covarrubias, Enrique, 2015. "Evolution in a Walrasian setting," MPRA Paper 64736, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Decentralized Trade; Exchange Economies; Housing Markets; Stochastic Stability; Logit Model; Social Welfare Functions;

    JEL classification:

    • C79 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Other
    • D51 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Exchange and Production Economies
    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations

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