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The financial market impact of UK quantitative easing

In: Threat of fiscal dominance?

  • Francis Breedon

    (University of London)

  • Jagjit S Chadha

    (University of Kent)

  • Alex Waters

    (University of Kent)

After outlining some of the monetary developments associated with Quantitative Easing (QE), we measure the impact of the UK's initial 2009-10 QE Programme on bonds and other assets. First, we use a macro-finance yield curve both to create a counterfactual path for bond yields and to estimate the impact of QE directly. Second, we analyse the impact of individual QE operations on a range of asset prices. We find that QE significantly lowered government bond yields through the portfolio balance channel - by around 50 or so basis points. We also uncover significant effects of individual operations but limited pass through to other assets.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Bank for International Settlements, 2012. "Threat of fiscal dominance?," BIS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 65, March.
  • This item is provided by Bank for International Settlements in its series BIS Papers chapters with number 65-16.
    Handle: RePEc:bis:bisbpc:65-16
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    1. Jonathan H. Wright, 2011. "What does Monetary Policy do to Long-Term Interest Rates at the Zero Lower Bound?," NBER Working Papers 17154, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Christopher J. Neely, 2010. "The large scale asset purchases had large international effects," Working Papers 2010-018, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    3. António Afonso & Manuel M. F. Martins, 2010. "Level, Slope, Curvature of Sovereign Yield Curve and Fiscal Behaviour," Working Papers Department of Economics 2010/23, ISEG - School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, University of Lisbon.
    4. Harald Hau & Massimo Massa & Joel Peress, 2010. "Do Demand Curves for Currencies Slope Down? Evidence from the MSCI Global Index Change," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 23(4), pages 1681-1717, April.
    5. Joyce, Michael & Lasaosa, Ana & Stevens , Ibrahim & Tong, Matthew, 2010. "The financial market impact of quantitative easing," Bank of England working papers 393, Bank of England.
    6. Svensson, L.E.O., 1994. "Estimating and Interpreting Foreward Interest Rates: Sweden 1992-1994," Papers 579, Stockholm - International Economic Studies.
    7. Eric T. Swanson, 2011. "Let's Twist Again: A High-Frequency Event-study Analysis of Operation Twist and Its Implications for QE2," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 42(1 (Spring), pages 151-207.
    8. Diebold, Francis X. & Rudebusch, Glenn D. & Borag[caron]an Aruoba, S., 2006. "The macroeconomy and the yield curve: a dynamic latent factor approach," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 131(1-2), pages 309-338.
    9. Svensson, Lars E O, 1994. "Estimating and Interpreting Forward Interest Rates: Sweden 1992-4," CEPR Discussion Papers 1051, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Christopher Martin & Costas Milas, 2012. "Quantitative easing: a sceptical survey," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(4), pages 750-764, WINTER.
    11. Joseph Gagnon & Matthew Raskin & Julie Remache & Brian Sack, 2010. "Large-scale asset purchases by the Federal Reserve: did they work?," Staff Reports 441, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    12. Chadha,Jagjit S. & Holly,Sean (ed.), 2011. "Interest Rates, Prices and Liquidity," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107014732.
    13. Farooq Ahmad & James Steeley, 2008. "Secondary market pricing behaviour around UK bond auctions," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(9), pages 691-699.
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