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Lisa Schulkind

Personal Details

First Name:Lisa
Middle Name:
Last Name:Schulkind
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psc567
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://lisaschulkind.weebly.com

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Belk College of Business
University of North Carolina-Charlotte

Charlotte, North Carolina (United States)
http://www.belkcollege.uncc.edu/default.asp?id=67&objId=3

:


RePEc:edi:denccus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jessamyn Schaller & Lisa Schulkind & Teny Maghakian Shapiro, 2017. "The Effects of Perceived Disease Risk and Access Costs on Infant Immunization," NBER Working Papers 23923, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Danielle H. Sandler & Lisa Schulkind, 2016. "The Timing of Teenage Births: Estimating the Effect on High School Graduation and Later Life Outcomes," Working Papers 16-39, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  3. Lisa Schulkind, 2013. "The Timing of Teenage Births and the Economic Returns to Education," Working Papers 1304, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
  4. Lisa Schulkind, 2013. "Getting a Sporting Chance: Title IX and the Intergenerational Transmission of Health," Working Papers 1305, Trinity College, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Lisa Schulkind & Danielle H. Sandler, 2019. "The Timing of Teenage Births: Estimating the Effect on High School Graduation and Later-Life Outcomes," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(1), pages 345-365, February.
  2. Schaller, Jessamyn & Schulkind, Lisa & Shapiro, Teny, 2019. "Disease outbreaks, healthcare utilization, and on-time immunization in the first year of life," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).
  3. Lisa Schulkind, 2017. "Getting a Sporting Chance: Title IX and the Intergenerational Transmission of Health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(12), pages 1583-1600, December.
  4. Foote, Andrew & Schulkind, Lisa & Shapiro, Teny M., 2015. "Missed signals: The effect of ACT college-readiness measures on post-secondary decisions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 39-51.
  5. Schulkind, Lisa & Shapiro, Teny Maghakian, 2014. "What a difference a day makes: Quantifying the effects of birth timing manipulation on infant health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 139-158.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jessamyn Schaller & Lisa Schulkind & Teny Maghakian Shapiro, 2017. "The Effects of Perceived Disease Risk and Access Costs on Infant Immunization," NBER Working Papers 23923, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Hoffmann, Manuel & Mosquera, Roberto & Chadi, Adrian, 2019. "Vaccines at Work," Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203661, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

  2. Lisa Schulkind, 2013. "Getting a Sporting Chance: Title IX and the Intergenerational Transmission of Health," Working Papers 1305, Trinity College, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Lindo, Jason M. & Marcotte, Dave E. & Palmer, Jane E. & Swensen, Isaac D., 2019. "Any press is good press? The unanticipated effects of Title IX investigations on university outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).

Articles

  1. Schaller, Jessamyn & Schulkind, Lisa & Shapiro, Teny, 2019. "Disease outbreaks, healthcare utilization, and on-time immunization in the first year of life," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).

    Cited by:

    1. Shoji, Masahiro & Cato, Susumu & Iida, Takashi & Ishida, Kenji & Ito, Asei & McElwain, Kenneth, 2020. "COVID-19 and Social Distancing in the Absence of Legal Enforcement: Survey Evidence from Japan," MPRA Paper 100723, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Anikó Bíró & Ágnes Szabó-Morvai, 2020. "Mass media coverage and vaccination uptake: evidence from the demand for meningococcal vaccinations in Hungary," CERS-IE WORKING PAPERS 2018, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.

  2. Lisa Schulkind, 2017. "Getting a Sporting Chance: Title IX and the Intergenerational Transmission of Health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(12), pages 1583-1600, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Foote, Andrew & Schulkind, Lisa & Shapiro, Teny M., 2015. "Missed signals: The effect of ACT college-readiness measures on post-secondary decisions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 39-51.

    Cited by:

    1. Bo, Shiyu & Liu, Jing & Shiu, Ji-Liang & Song, Yan & Zhou, Sen, 2019. "Admission mechanisms and the mismatch between colleges and students: Evidence from a large administrative dataset from China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 27-37.
    2. Naihobe Gonzalez, "undated". "Small Changes Make a Big Difference: How Behavioral Science Improved Participation in Advanced Placement (Issue Brief)," Mathematica Policy Research Reports e2356565d4c04588af65ca5ac, Mathematica Policy Research.
    3. Christopher Avery & Oded Gurantz & Michael Hurwitz & Jonathan Smith, 2016. "Shifting College Majors in Response to Advanced Placement Exam Scores," NBER Working Papers 22841, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Feng, Qiang & Wang, Xiaojun, 2018. "The psychological effects of academic labeling: The case of class tracks," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 568-581.
    5. Adam Weiss & Sang Hwang, 2019. "Utilizing American and Korean College Admissions Exams to Assess Adult ESL Students’ College Readiness," Asian Journal of Social Sciences and Management Studies, Asian Online Journal Publishing Group, vol. 6(2), pages 30-38.
    6. Mauricio Villamizar-Villegas & Freddy A. Pinzón-Puerto & María Alejandra Ruiz-Sánchez, 2020. "A Comprehensive History of Regression Discontinuity Designs: An Empirical Survey of the last 60 Years," Borradores de Economia 1112, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    7. Naihobe Gonzalez, "undated". "How Learning About One's Ability Affects Educational Investments: Evidence from the Advanced Placement Program," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 307d565f1bf14eb8808071847, Mathematica Policy Research.
    8. Joshua Hyman, 2018. "Nudges, College Enrollment, and College Persistence: Evidence From a Statewide Experiment in Michigan," Working papers 2018-10, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    9. Kolesnikova, Irina Vladimirovna & Dobrynina, Valentina Ivanovna & Kal'chenko, Anna Georgievna, "undated". "Management of Entrepreneurial Activity in Family Business. Russian Experience," Published Papers nvg124, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.

  4. Schulkind, Lisa & Shapiro, Teny Maghakian, 2014. "What a difference a day makes: Quantifying the effects of birth timing manipulation on infant health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 139-158.

    Cited by:

    1. Halla, Martin & Liu, Chia-Lun & Liu, Jin-Tan, 2019. "The Effect of Superstition on Health: Evidence from the Taiwanese Ghost Month," IZA Discussion Papers 12066, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Huang, Cheng & Zhang, Shiying & Zhao, Qingguo, 2020. "The early bird catches the worm? School entry cutoff and the timing of births," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 143(C).
    3. Sara LaLumia & James M. Sallee & Nicholas Turner, 2013. "New Evidence on Taxes and the Timing of Birth," NBER Working Papers 19283, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Philippe Wingender & Sara LaLumia, 2016. "Income Effects in Labor Supply: Evidence from Child-Related Tax Benefits," Working Papers 16-24, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    5. Maruyama, Shiko & Heinesen, Eskil, 2020. "Another look at returns to birthweight," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C).
    6. Almond, Douglas & Chee, Christine Pal & Sviatschi, Maria Micaela & Zhong, Nan, 2015. "Auspicious birth dates among Chinese in California," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 153-159.
    7. Hendrik Jürges, 2017. "Financial incentives, timing of births, and infant health: a closer look into the delivery room," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(2), pages 195-208, March.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EDU: Education (2) 2013-03-16 2016-09-25. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2013-03-16 2017-10-29. Author is listed
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-03-16. Author is listed

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