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Laura Salisbury

Personal Details

First Name:Laura
Middle Name:
Last Name:Salisbury
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psa1252
https://sites.google.com/site/laurahsalisbury
Terminal Degree:2013 Department of Economics; Boston University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
York University

Toronto, Canada
http://econ.laps.yorku.ca/
RePEc:edi:dyorkca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Olivetti, Claudia & Paserman, M. Daniele & Salisbury, Laura & Weber, E. Anna, 2020. "Who Married, (to) Whom, and Where? Trends in Marriage in the United States, 1850-1940," IZA Discussion Papers 13811, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  2. Koudijs, Peter A. E. & Salisbury, Laura, 2018. "Limited Liability and Investment: Evidence from Changes in Marital Property Laws in the U.S. South, 1840-1850," Research Papers 3753, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  3. Peter Koudijs & Laura Salisbury & Gurpal Sran, 2018. "For Richer, for Poorer: Bankers' Liability and Risk-taking in New England, 1867-1880," NBER Working Papers 24998, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Claudia Olivetti & M. Daniele Paserman & Laura Salisbury, 2016. "Three-generation Mobility in the United States, 1850-1940: The Role of Maternal and Paternal Grandparents," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 903, Boston College Department of Economics.
  5. Peter Koudijs & Laura Salisbury, 2016. "Bankruptcy and Investment: Evidence from Changes in Marital Property Laws in the U.S. South, 1840-1850," NBER Working Papers 21952, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Shari Eli & Laura Salisbury & Allison Shertzer, 2016. "Migration Responses to Conflict: Evidence from the Border of the American Civil War," NBER Working Papers 22591, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Shari Eli & Laura Salisbury, 2015. "Patronage Politics and the Development of the Welfare State: Confederate Pensions in the American South," NBER Working Papers 20829, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Laura Salisbury, 2014. "Women's Income and Marriage Markets in the United States: Evidence from the Civil War Pension," NBER Working Papers 20201, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Peter Koudijs & Laura Salisbury & Gurpal Sran, 2021. "For Richer, for Poorer: Bankers' Liability and Bank Risk in New England, 1867 to 1880," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 76(3), pages 1541-1599, June.
  2. Koudijs, Peter & Salisbury, Laura, 2020. "Limited liability and investment: Evidence from changes in marital property laws in the US South, 1840–1850," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 138(1), pages 1-26.
  3. Olivetti, Claudia & Paserman, M. Daniele & Salisbury, Laura, 2018. "Three-generation mobility in the United States, 1850–1940: The role of maternal and paternal grandparents," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 73-90.
  4. Eli, Shari & Salisbury, Laura & Shertzer, Allison, 2018. "Ideology and Migration after the American Civil War," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 78(3), pages 822-861, September.
  5. Bond Timothy N. & Salisbury Laura, 2018. "Local Information, Income Segregation, and Geographic Mobility," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(3), pages 1-17, July.
  6. Salisbury, Laura, 2017. "Women's Income and Marriage Markets in the United States: Evidence from the Civil War Pension," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(1), pages 1-38, March.
  7. Eli, Shari & Salisbury, Laura, 2016. "Patronage Politics and the Development of the Welfare State: Confederate Pensions in the American South," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 76(4), pages 1078-1112, December.
  8. Salisbury, Laura, 2014. "Selective migration, wages, and occupational mobility in nineteenth century America," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 40-63.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Peter Koudijs & Laura Salisbury & Gurpal Sran, 2018. "For Richer, for Poorer: Bankers' Liability and Risk-taking in New England, 1867-1880," NBER Working Papers 24998, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Koudijs, Peter A. E. & Salisbury, Laura, 2018. "Limited Liability and Investment: Evidence from Changes in Marital Property Laws in the U.S. South, 1840-1850," Research Papers 3753, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    2. Haelim Anderson & Daniel Barth & Dong Beom Choi, 2018. "Reducing Moral Hazard at the Expense of Market Discipline: The Effectiveness of Double Liability Before and During the Great Depression," Working Papers 18-06, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury.

  2. Claudia Olivetti & M. Daniele Paserman & Laura Salisbury, 2016. "Three-generation Mobility in the United States, 1850-1940: The Role of Maternal and Paternal Grandparents," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 903, Boston College Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Simon Clark, 2020. ""You're Just My Type!" Matching and Payoffs When Like Attracts Like," Edinburgh School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 295, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    2. Eiji Yamamura, 2021. "View about consumption tax and grandchildren," Papers 2102.04658, arXiv.org.
    3. Adermon, Adrian & Lindahl, Mikael & Waldenström, Daniel, 2016. "Intergenerational wealth mobility and the role of inheritance: Evidence from multiple generations," CEPR Discussion Papers 11456, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Kelly Vosters & Jørgen Modalsli, 2019. "Spillover bias in multigenerational income regressions," Discussion Papers 897, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    5. Shelly Lundberg & Aloysius Siow, 2017. "Canadian contributions to family economics," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 50(5), pages 1304-1323, December.
    6. Andra C. Ghent & Marianna Kudlyak, 2016. "Intergenerational Linkages in Household Credit," Working Paper Series 2016-31, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    7. Inwood, Kris & Minns, Chris & Summerfield, Fraser, 2019. "Occupational income scores and immigrant assimilation. Evidence from the Canadian census," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 114-122.
    8. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Platt Boustan & Elisa Jácome & Santiago Pérez, 2019. "Intergenerational Mobility of Immigrants in the US over Two Centuries," NBER Working Papers 26408, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Alberto Alesina & Sebastian Hohmann & Stelios Michalopoulos & Elias Papaioannou, 2019. "Intergenerational Mobility in Africa," NBER Working Papers 25534, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Samuel Bazzi & Martin Fiszbein & Mesay Gebresilasse, 2020. "Frontier Culture: The Roots and Persistence of “Rugged Individualism” in the United States," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 88(6), pages 2329-2368, November.
    11. Anke Becker, 2019. "On the Economic Origins of Restrictions on Women's Sexuality," CESifo Working Paper Series 7770, CESifo.
    12. Teresa Barbieri & Francesco Bloise & Michele Raitano, 2020. "Intergenerational Earnings Inequality: New Evidence From Italy," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 66(2), pages 418-443, June.
    13. Martin Nybom & Jan Stuhler, 2019. "Steady-state assumptions in intergenerational mobility research," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 17(1), pages 77-97, March.
    14. John Komlos, 2016. "Unemployment in a Just Economy," CESifo Working Paper Series 5974, CESifo.
    15. Ian Lundberg, 2020. "Does Opportunity Skip Generations? Reassessing Evidence From Sibling and Cousin Correlations," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(4), pages 1193-1213, August.

  3. Peter Koudijs & Laura Salisbury, 2016. "Bankruptcy and Investment: Evidence from Changes in Marital Property Laws in the U.S. South, 1840-1850," NBER Working Papers 21952, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Hazan, Moshe & Weiss, David & Zoabi, Hosny, 2016. "Women's Liberation as a Financial Innovation," CEPR Discussion Papers 11371, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. James J. Feigenbaum & James Lee & Filippo Mezzanotti, 2018. "Capital Destruction and Economic Growth: The Effects of Sherman's March, 1850-1920," NBER Working Papers 25392, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Shari Eli & Laura Salisbury & Allison Shertzer, 2016. "Migration Responses to Conflict: Evidence from the Border of the American Civil War," NBER Working Papers 22591, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Ran Abramitzky & Roy Mill & Santiago Pérez, 2020. "Linking individuals across historical sources: A fully automated approach," Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(2), pages 94-111, April.
    2. Inwood, Kris & Minns, Chris & Summerfield, Fraser, 2019. "Occupational income scores and immigrant assimilation. Evidence from the Canadian census," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 114-122.
    3. Costa, Dora L. & Kahn, Matthew E. & Roudiez, Christopher & Wilson, Sven, 2018. "Persistent social networks: Civil war veterans who fought together co-locate in later life," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 289-299.
    4. Thierry Baudassé & Rémi Bazillier & Ismaël Issifou, 2018. "Migration and Institutions: Exit and Voice (from Abroad)?," Post-Print halshs-01517185, HAL.
    5. Martha Bailey & Connor Cole & Morgan Henderson & Catherine Massey, 2017. "How Well Do Automated Linking Methods Perform? Lessons from U.S. Historical Data," NBER Working Papers 24019, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  5. Shari Eli & Laura Salisbury, 2015. "Patronage Politics and the Development of the Welfare State: Confederate Pensions in the American South," NBER Working Papers 20829, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Platt Boustan & Katherine Eriksson & James J. Feigenbaum & Santiago Pérez, 2019. "Automated Linking of Historical Data," NBER Working Papers 25825, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Paola Azar & Sergio Espuelas, 2021. "Democracy and primary education spending in Spain, 1902-22," UB Economics Working Papers 2021/409, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB School of Economics.
    3. Anna Aizer & Shari Eli & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2020. "The Incentive Effects of Cash Transfers to the Poor," NBER Working Papers 27523, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Ran Abramitzky, 2015. "Economics and the Modern Economic Historian," NBER Working Papers 21636, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  6. Laura Salisbury, 2014. "Women's Income and Marriage Markets in the United States: Evidence from the Civil War Pension," NBER Working Papers 20201, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Shari Eli & Laura Salisbury & Allison Shertzer, 2016. "Migration Responses to Conflict: Evidence from the Border of the American Civil War," NBER Working Papers 22591, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ager, Philipp & Boustan, Leah & Eriksson, Katherine, 2019. "The intergenerational effects of a large wealth shock: White southerners after the Civil War," CEPR Discussion Papers 13660, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Richard Chisik, 2010. "Job Market Signalling, Stereotype Threat, and Counter-Stereotypical Behaviour," Working Papers 024, Ryerson University, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2013.
    4. Ruobing Liang & Xiaobing Wang & Futoshi Yamauchi, 2021. "Cotton Revolution and Widow Chastity in Ming and Qing China," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 103(1), pages 232-252, January.
    5. Kota Ogasawara & Erika Igarashi, 2021. "The Impacts of the Gender Imbalance on Marriage and Birth: Evidence from World War II in Japan," Papers 2102.00687, arXiv.org.
    6. Liang, Ruobing & Wang, Xiaobing & Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2018. "Cotton Revolution And Widow Chastity In Ming And Qing China," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274177, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Dupraz, Yannick & Ferrara, Andreas, 2021. "Fatherless: The Long-Term Effects of Losing a Father in the U.S. Civil War," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 538, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    8. Eli, Shari & Salisbury, Laura, 2016. "Patronage Politics and the Development of the Welfare State: Confederate Pensions in the American South," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 76(4), pages 1078-1112, December.
    9. Dora L. Costa & Heather DeSomer & Eric Hanss & Christopher Roudiez & Sven E. Wilson & Noelle Yetter, 2016. "Union Army Veterans, All Grown Up," NBER Working Papers 22497, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. You, Jing & Yi, Xuejie & Chen, Meng, 2016. "Love, Life, and “Leftover Ladies” in Urban China," MPRA Paper 70494, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Peter Koudijs & Laura Salisbury & Gurpal Sran, 2021. "For Richer, for Poorer: Bankers' Liability and Bank Risk in New England, 1867 to 1880," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 76(3), pages 1541-1599, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Felipe Aldunate & Dirk Jenter & Arthur Korteweg & Peter Koudijs, 2021. "Shareholder Liability and Bank Failure," CESifo Working Paper Series 9168, CESifo.

  2. Olivetti, Claudia & Paserman, M. Daniele & Salisbury, Laura, 2018. "Three-generation mobility in the United States, 1850–1940: The role of maternal and paternal grandparents," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 73-90.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Eli, Shari & Salisbury, Laura & Shertzer, Allison, 2018. "Ideology and Migration after the American Civil War," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 78(3), pages 822-861, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Ager, Philipp & Boustan, Leah & Eriksson, Katherine, 2019. "The intergenerational effects of a large wealth shock: White southerners after the Civil War," CEPR Discussion Papers 13660, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Dupraz, Yannick & Ferrara, Andreas, 2021. "Fatherless: The Long-Term Effects of Losing a Father in the U.S. Civil War," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 538, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).

  4. Salisbury, Laura, 2017. "Women's Income and Marriage Markets in the United States: Evidence from the Civil War Pension," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(1), pages 1-38, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Eli, Shari & Salisbury, Laura, 2016. "Patronage Politics and the Development of the Welfare State: Confederate Pensions in the American South," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 76(4), pages 1078-1112, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Salisbury, Laura, 2014. "Selective migration, wages, and occupational mobility in nineteenth century America," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 40-63.

    Cited by:

    1. Ran Abramitzky & Roy Mill & Santiago Pérez, 2020. "Linking individuals across historical sources: A fully automated approach," Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(2), pages 94-111, April.
    2. Shari Eli & Laura Salisbury & Allison Shertzer, 2016. "Migration Responses to Conflict: Evidence from the Border of the American Civil War," NBER Working Papers 22591, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Inwood, Kris & Minns, Chris & Summerfield, Fraser, 2019. "Occupational income scores and immigrant assimilation. Evidence from the Canadian census," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 114-122.
    4. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Platt Boustan & Katherine Eriksson & James J. Feigenbaum & Santiago Pérez, 2019. "Automated Linking of Historical Data," NBER Working Papers 25825, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Bond Timothy N. & Salisbury Laura, 2018. "Local Information, Income Segregation, and Geographic Mobility," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(3), pages 1-17, July.
    6. Dribe, Martin & Eriksson, Björn & Scalone, Francesco, 2019. "Migration, marriage and social mobility: Women in Sweden 1880–1900," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 93-111.
    7. Salisbury, Laura, 2017. "Women's Income and Marriage Markets in the United States: Evidence from the Civil War Pension," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(1), pages 1-38, March.
    8. Zachary Ward, 2019. "Internal Migration, Education and Upward Rank Mobility:Evidence from American History," CEH Discussion Papers 04, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 11 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (11) 2014-06-14 2015-01-26 2016-03-23 2016-03-29 2016-04-04 2016-09-18 2018-10-01 2019-05-06 2020-11-16 2020-11-23 2021-05-17. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (3) 2014-06-14 2020-11-16 2021-05-17. Author is listed
  3. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (2) 2016-03-29 2016-04-04
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2016-04-04 2020-11-23
  5. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2015-01-26
  6. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2015-01-26
  7. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2020-11-23
  8. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2019-05-06
  9. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2016-09-18
  10. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2015-01-26
  11. NEP-SOG: Sociology of Economics (1) 2016-09-18
  12. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2020-11-16

Corrections

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