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Solmaz Moslehi

Personal Details

First Name:Solmaz
Middle Name:
Last Name:Moslehi
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmo715
http://www.moslehi.me/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Monash Business School
Monash University

Melbourne, Australia
http://business.monash.edu/economics

: +61 3 990 52493
+61 3 990 55476
Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168
RePEc:edi:demonau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Books

Working papers

  1. Moro, Alessio & Moslehi, Solmaz & Tanaka, Satoshi, 2015. "Marriage and Economic Development in the Twentieth Century," Discussion Paper Series 629, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  2. Alessio Moro & Solmaz Moslehi & Alessio Moro, 2015. "Does Home Production Drive Structural Transformation?," Monash Economics Working Papers 20-15, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  3. Pedro Gomis-Porqueras & Solmaz Moslehi & Vivianne Vilar, 2013. "The Fiscal Theory of the Price Level When All Income is Taxed," Monash Economics Working Papers 09-13, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  4. Gomis Porqueras, Pedro Gomis & Moslehi, Solmaz & Suen, Richard M. H., 2013. "Endogenous health in a model of calories, medical services and health shocks," Working Papers eco_2013_4, Deakin University, Department of Economics.
  5. Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi & Siew Ling Yew, 2012. "Public-Private Mix of Health Expenditure: A Political Economy Approach and A Quantitative Exercise," Monash Economics Working Papers 11-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  6. Creedy, John & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2012. "The Composition of Government Expenditure with Alternative Choice Mechanisms," Working Paper Series 2433, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
  7. John Creedy and Solmaz Moslehi, 2010. "A Loglinear Tax and Transfer Function:," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1112, The University of Melbourne.
  8. John Creedy & Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi, 2009. "Inequality Aversion and the Optimal Composition of Government Expenditure," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1086, The University of Melbourne.
  9. John Creedy & Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi, 2008. "The Composition of Government Expenditure in an Overlapping Generations Model," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1043, The University of Melbourne.
  10. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2008. "Voting over Taxes and Expenditure: The Role of Home Production," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1052, The University of Melbourne.
  11. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2007. "The Optimal Composition of Government Expenditure," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1008, The University of Melbourne.
  12. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2007. "Modelling the Composition of Government Expenditure in Democracies," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1007, The University of Melbourne.

Articles

  1. Alessio Moro & Solmaz Moslehi & Satoshi Tanaka, 2017. "Does Home Production Drive Structural Transformation?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 116-146, July.
  2. Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi & Siew Ling Yew, 2016. "Publicprivate mix of health expenditure: A political economy and quantitative analysis," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 49(2), pages 834-866, May.
  3. Gomis-Porqueras, Pedro & Moslehi, Solmaz & Suen, Richard M.H., 2016. "The role of dietary choices and medical expenditures on health outcomes when health shocks are endogenous," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 13-25.
  4. Farhadi, Minoo & Islam, Md. Rabiul & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2015. "Economic Freedom and Productivity Growth in Resource-rich Economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 109-126.
  5. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2014. "The composition of government expenditure with alternative choicemechanisms," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(1), pages 53-71, April.
  6. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2011. "A loglinear tax and transfer function: majority voting and optimal rates," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 14(1), pages 1-14.
  7. John Creedy & Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi, 2011. "The Composition Of Government Expenditure: Economic Conditions And Preferences," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(1), pages 94-107, January.
  8. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2010. "The Optimal Division Of Government Expenditure Between Public Goods And Transfer Payments," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(2), pages 87-100, June.
  9. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2010. "The Role of Home Production in Voting Over Taxes and Expenditure," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 13(1), pages 81-97.
  10. John Creedy & Solamz Moslehi, 2010. "The optimal composition of government expenditure among transfers, education and public goods," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 194(3), pages 41-64, June.
  11. Creedy, John & Li, Shuyun May & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2010. "Inequality Aversion And The Optimal Composition Of Government Expenditure," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(S2), pages 290-306, November.
  12. Creedy, John & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2009. "Modelling the composition of government expenditure in democracies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 42-55, March.

Books

  1. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2011. "Modelling the Composition of Government Expenditure," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14564.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Moro, Alessio & Moslehi, Solmaz & Tanaka, Satoshi, 2015. "Marriage and Economic Development in the Twentieth Century," Discussion Paper Series 629, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

    Cited by:

    1. Iyigun, Murat & Lafortune, Jeanne, 2016. "Why Wait? A Century of Education, Marriage Timing and Gender Roles," IZA Discussion Papers 9671, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  2. Alessio Moro & Solmaz Moslehi & Alessio Moro, 2015. "Does Home Production Drive Structural Transformation?," Monash Economics Working Papers 20-15, Monash University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Moro, Alessio & Moslehi, Solmaz & Tanaka, Satoshi, 2015. "Marriage and Economic Development in the Twentieth Century," Discussion Paper Series 629, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. Fabio Cerina & Alessio Moro & Michelle Petersen Rendall, 2017. "The role of gender in employment polarization," ECON - Working Papers 250, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    3. Cuberes David & Teignier Marc, 2018. "Macroeconomic costs of gender gaps in a model with entrepreneurship and household production," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 18(1), pages 1-15, January.
    4. Edgar Cruz & Xavier Raurich, 2018. "Leisure Time and the Sectoral Composition of Employment," UB Economics Working Papers 2018/373, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.
    5. Bridgman, Benjamin & Duernecker, Georg & Herrendorf, Berthold, 2018. "Structural transformation, marketization, and household production around the world," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 102-126.
    6. Duval-Hernandez, Robert & Fang, Lei & Ngai, L. Rachel, 2018. "Social subsidies and marketization - the role of gender and skill," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 87181, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Benjamin Bridgman, 2013. "Home Productivity," BEA Working Papers 0091, Bureau of Economic Analysis.
    8. Benjamin Bridgman, 2016. "Engines of Leisure," BEA Working Papers 0137, Bureau of Economic Analysis.
    9. Safonova, Dasha, 2017. "Home production, employment, and monetary policy," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 57-66.
    10. Miguel Sánchez-Romero & Gemma Abio & Concepció Patxot & Guadalupe Souto, 2018. "Contribution of demography to economic growth," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 27-64, March.
    11. Rachel Ngai & Lei Fang & Robert Duval Hernandez, 2017. "Taxes and Market Hours -- the Role of Gender and Skill," 2017 Meeting Papers 680, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    12. Jaime Alonso-Carrera & María Jesús Freire-Serén & Xavier Raurich, 2017. "Anatomizing the Mechanics of Structural Change," UB Economics Working Papers 2017/360, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.

  3. Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi & Siew Ling Yew, 2012. "Public-Private Mix of Health Expenditure: A Political Economy Approach and A Quantitative Exercise," Monash Economics Working Papers 11-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Alice sanwald & Engelbert Theurl, 2014. "What drives out-of pocket health expenditures of private households? - Empirical evidence from the Austrian household budget survey," Working Papers 2014-04, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.

  4. John Creedy & Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi, 2008. "The Composition of Government Expenditure in an Overlapping Generations Model," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1043, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. Florian Misch & Norman Gemmell & Richard Kneller, 2014. "Using surveys of business perceptions as a guide to growth-enhancing fiscal reforms," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 22(4), pages 683-725, October.

  5. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2007. "The Optimal Composition of Government Expenditure," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1008, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. John Creedy & Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi, 2008. "The Composition of Government Expenditure in an Overlapping Generations Model," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1043, The University of Melbourne.
    2. Agustín Molina Morales & Ignacio Amate Fortes & Almudena Guarnido, 2013. "Institutions and Public Expenditure on Education in OECD Countries," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 204(1), pages 67-84, March.

  6. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2007. "Modelling the Composition of Government Expenditure in Democracies," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1007, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. Momi Dahan & Michel Strawczynski, 2010. "Fiscal Rules and Composition Bias in OECD Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 3088, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Ryo Arawatari & Tetsuo Ono, 2011. "Redistributive Politics and Government Debt in a Borrowing-constrained Economy," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 11-02, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    3. Tetsuo Ono, 2013. "Public Education and Social Security: A Political Economy Approach," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 13-06, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    4. Branko Milanovic, 2010. "Four Critiques of the Redistribution Hypothesis: An Assessment," LIS Working papers 530, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    5. John Creedy & Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi, 2008. "The Composition of Government Expenditure in an Overlapping Generations Model," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1043, The University of Melbourne.
    6. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2010. "The Optimal Division Of Government Expenditure Between Public Goods And Transfer Payments," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(2), pages 87-100, June.
    7. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2007. "The Optimal Composition of Government Expenditure," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1008, The University of Melbourne.
    8. Tetsuo Ono, 2014. "Economic Growth and the Politics of Intergenerational Redistribution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 14-17-Rev., Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Sep 2015.
    9. Agnese Sacchi & Simone Salotti, 2012. "A comprehensive anlysis of expenditure decentralization and of the composition of local public spending," Departmental Working Papers of Economics - University 'Roma Tre' 0155, Department of Economics - University Roma Tre.
    10. Creedy, John & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2012. "The Composition of Government Expenditure with Alternative Choice Mechanisms," Working Paper Series 2433, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    11. Creedy, John & Gemmell, Norman & Scobie, Grant, 2015. "Pensions, Savings and Housing: A Life-cycle Framework with Policy Simulations," Working Paper Series 3763, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    12. Creedy, John & Li, Shuyun May & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2010. "Inequality Aversion And The Optimal Composition Of Government Expenditure," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(S2), pages 290-306, November.
    13. Tetsuo Ono, 2016. "Inequality and the politics of redistribution," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(2), pages 191-217, April.
    14. John Creedy & Solamz Moslehi, 2010. "The optimal composition of government expenditure among transfers, education and public goods," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 194(3), pages 41-64, June.
    15. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2008. "Voting over Taxes and Expenditure: The Role of Home Production," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1052, The University of Melbourne.
    16. Tetsuo Ono, 2012. "Inequality Dynamics and the Politics of Redistribution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 12-09-Rev, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Nov 2013.

Articles

  1. Alessio Moro & Solmaz Moslehi & Satoshi Tanaka, 2017. "Does Home Production Drive Structural Transformation?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 116-146, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Farhadi, Minoo & Islam, Md. Rabiul & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2015. "Economic Freedom and Productivity Growth in Resource-rich Economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 109-126.

    Cited by:

    1. Badeeb, Ramez Abubakr & Lean, Hooi Hooi & Clark, Jeremy, 2017. "The evolution of the natural resource curse thesis: A critical literature survey," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 123-134.
    2. Ogundari, Kolawole & Awokuse, Titus, 2018. "Human capital contribution to economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does health status matter more than education?," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 131-140.
    3. Veysel ULUSOY & Cumhur TAŞ, 2017. "On the effects of total productivity growth of economic freedom and total resource rents: The case of both natural resource rich and OECD countries," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(3(612), A), pages 173-192, Autumn.
    4. Edwards, Ryan B., 2016. "Mining away the Preston curve," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 22-36.
    5. Joël CARIOLLE, 2016. "The voracity and scarcity effects of export booms and busts on bribery," Working Papers P146, FERDI.
    6. Cockx, Lara & Francken, Nathalie, 2016. "Natural resources: A curse on education spending?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 394-408.
    7. Magali Dauvin & David Guerreiro, 2016. "The Paradox of Plenty: A Meta-Analysis," EconomiX Working Papers 2016-14, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    8. Arthelo P. PALMA, 2016. "Truth Behind Economic Performance, Natural Resources and Attracting Foreign Direct Investment," Expert Journal of Economics, Sprint Investify, vol. 4(2), pages 68-77.
    9. Ho Thuy Ai & Ping, Lin, 2018. "Impacts of fiscal policy on economic growth: Another look from institutional perspective," Economics Discussion Papers 2018-45, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    10. Badeeb, Ramez Abubakr & Lean, Hooi Hooi & Smyth, Russell, 2016. "Oil curse and finance–growth nexus in Malaysia: The role of investment," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 154-165.
    11. Colin O'Reilly & Ryan H. Murphy, 2017. "Do Institutions Mitigate The Risk Of Natural Resource Conflicts?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(3), pages 532-541, July.
    12. Ali, Amjad & Zulfiqar, Kalsoom, 2018. "An Assessment of Association between Natural Resources Agglomeration and Unemployment in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 89022, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2018.
    13. Colin O’Reilly & Ryan H. Murphy, 2017. "Exogenous Resource Shocks and Economic Freedom," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 59(3), pages 243-260, September.
    14. Kim, Dong-Hyeon & Lin, Shu-Chin, 2017. "Human capital and natural resource dependence," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 92-102.
    15. Younes Nademi, 2018. "The resource curse and income inequality in Iran," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 52(3), pages 1159-1172, May.
    16. Ogundari, Kolawole & Awokuse, Titus, 2016. "Assessing the Contribution of Agricultural Productivity to Food Security levels in Sub-Saharan African countries," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235730, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

  3. John Creedy & Shuyun May Li & Solmaz Moslehi, 2011. "The Composition Of Government Expenditure: Economic Conditions And Preferences," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(1), pages 94-107, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Tetsuo Ono, 2013. "Public Education and Social Security: A Political Economy Approach," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 13-06, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    2. Tetsuo Ono, 2014. "Economic Growth and the Politics of Intergenerational Redistribution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 14-17-Rev., Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Sep 2015.
    3. Bossi, Luca & Gumus, Gulcin, 2011. "Income Inequality, Mobility, and the Welfare State: A Political Economy Model," IZA Discussion Papers 5909, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Rodríguez-Nava, Abigail & Venegas-Martínez, Francisco & López-Herrera, Francisco, 2014. "La necesidad de la reforma fiscal para PEMEX: viabilidad económica y financiera," Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación de la Escuela Superios de Economía del Instituto Politécnico Nacional,in: Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México (ed.), Efectos de las reformas estructurales en las fluctuaciones cíclicas y el crecimiento económico en México, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 43-70 Escuela Superior de Economía, Instituto Politécnico Nacional.
    5. Yamamura, Eiji, 2014. "Time preference and perceptions about government spending and tax: Smokers’ dependence on government support," MPRA Paper 55659, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Kirill Borissov & Joseph Hanna & Stephane Lambrecht, 2014. "Public Goods, Voting, and Growth," EUSP Department of Economics Working Paper Series Ec-01/14, European University at St. Petersburg, Department of Economics.
    7. Tetsuo Ono, 2012. "Inequality, Growth and the Politics of Education and Redistribution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 12-09, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).

  4. John Creedy & Solamz Moslehi, 2010. "The optimal composition of government expenditure among transfers, education and public goods," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 194(3), pages 41-64, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Agustín Molina Morales & Ignacio Amate Fortes & Almudena Guarnido, 2013. "Institutions and Public Expenditure on Education in OECD Countries," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 204(1), pages 67-84, March.

  5. Creedy, John & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2009. "Modelling the composition of government expenditure in democracies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 42-55, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.

Books

  1. John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi, 2011. "Modelling the Composition of Government Expenditure," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14564.

    Cited by:

    1. Creedy, John & Gemmell, Norman & Scobie, Grant, 2015. "Pensions, Savings and Housing: A Life-cycle Framework with Policy Simulations," Working Paper Series 3763, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 13 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (6) 2007-10-20 2007-10-20 2008-11-25 2010-01-10 2012-10-13 2013-05-19. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (5) 2008-11-25 2010-01-10 2013-11-02 2015-09-11 2016-05-08. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (4) 2007-10-20 2010-01-10 2012-04-03 2012-10-13
  4. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (3) 2007-10-20 2012-04-03 2012-10-13
  5. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (3) 2010-01-10 2012-10-13 2013-05-19
  6. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2012-04-03 2013-11-02
  7. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2013-05-19 2016-05-08
  8. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2015-11-15
  9. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2016-05-08
  10. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (1) 2016-05-08

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