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Ning Li

Personal Details

First Name:Ning
Middle Name:
Last Name:Li
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pli660
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research (MIAESR)
Faculty of Business and Economics
University of Melbourne

Melbourne, Australia
http://www.melbourneinstitute.com/

: +61 3 8344 2100
+61 3 8344 2111
The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010
RePEc:edi:mimelau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Duncan McVicar & Mark Wooden & Felix Leung & Ning Li, 2016. "Work-Related Training and the Probability of Transitioning from Non-Permanent to Permanent Employment," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 54(3), pages 623-646, September.
  2. Ning Li, 2016. "Multidimensionality of Longitudinal Data: Unlocking the Age-Happiness Puzzle," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 305-320, August.
  3. Mark Wooden & Ning Li, 2014. "Panel Conditioning and Subjective Well-being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 117(1), pages 235-255, May.
  4. Robert Cummins & Ning Li & Mark Wooden & Mark Stokes, 2014. "A Demonstration of Set-Points for Subjective Wellbeing," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 183-206, February.
  5. Qian, Guoqi & Li, Ning & Huggins, Richard, 2011. "Using capture-recapture data and hybrid Monte Carlo sampling to estimate an animal population affected by an environmental catastrophe," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 655-666, January.
  6. Li, Ning & Qian, Guoqi & Huggins, Richard, 2006. "A latent variable model for estimating disease transmission rate from data on household outbreaks," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 50(11), pages 3354-3368, July.
  7. John B. Carlin & Ning Li & Philip Greenwood & Carolyn Coffey, 2003. "Tools for analyzing multiple imputed datasets," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 3(3), pages 226-244, September.
  8. Ning Li & Guoqi Qian & Richard Huggins, 2002. "Analysis of Between-Household Heterogeneity in Disease Transmission from Data on Outbreak Sizes," Australian & New Zealand Journal of Statistics, Australian Statistical Publishing Association Inc., vol. 44(4), pages 401-411, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Ning Li, 2016. "Multidimensionality of Longitudinal Data: Unlocking the Age-Happiness Puzzle," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 305-320, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Mark Wooden & Ning Li, 2016. "Ageing, Death and Life Satisfaction: Evidence from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(4), pages 474-482, December.

  2. Mark Wooden & Ning Li, 2014. "Panel Conditioning and Subjective Well-being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 117(1), pages 235-255, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrew E. Clark & Sarah Flèche & Claudia Senik, 2014. "Economic Growth Evens-Out Happiness: Evidence from Six Surveys," PSE Working Papers halshs-00936145, HAL.
    2. Mark Wooden & Ning Li, 2016. "Ageing, Death and Life Satisfaction: Evidence from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(4), pages 474-482, December.
    3. Ning Li, 2016. "Multidimensionality of Longitudinal Data: Unlocking the Age-Happiness Puzzle," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 305-320, August.
    4. Melisa Bubonya & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Mark Wooden, 2017. "Job loss and the mental health of spouses and adolescent children," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-27, December.
    5. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & McVicar, Duncan & Wooden, Mark, 2013. "Non-Standard 'Contingent' Employment and Job Satisfaction: A Panel Data Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 7590, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Cai, Lixin & Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Sloane, Peter J., 2016. "Low Paid Employment in Britain: Estimating State-Dependence and Stepping Stone Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 9633, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Matthew Manning & Christopher L. Ambrey & Christopher M. Fleming, 2016. "A Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Wellbeing in Australia," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(6), pages 2503-2525, December.
    8. Henna Busk & Christine Dauth & Elke J. Jahn, 2017. "Do Changes in Regulation Affect Temporary Agency Workers’ Job Satisfaction?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(3), pages 514-544, July.
    9. Ning Li, 2014. "Multidimensionality of Longitudinal Data: Unlocking the Age-Happiness Puzzle," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n04, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    10. Mine Kühn & Christian Dudel & Tobias C. Vogt & Anna Oksuzyan, 2017. "Trends in gender differences in health and mortality at working ages among West and East Germans," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2017-009, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

  3. Robert Cummins & Ning Li & Mark Wooden & Mark Stokes, 2014. "A Demonstration of Set-Points for Subjective Wellbeing," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 183-206, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Adrian J. Tomyn & Elli Tamir & Mark A. Stokes & Paulo C. Dias, 2016. "A Cross-Cultural Evaluation of the Personal Wellbeing Index – School Children in Samples of Australian and Portuguese Adolescents," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 11(3), pages 837-851, September.
    2. Ben Richardson & Matthew D. Fuller Tyszkiewicz & Adrian J. Tomyn & Robert A. Cummins, 2016. "The Psychometric Equivalence of the Personal Wellbeing Index for Normally Functioning and Homeostatically Defeated Australian Adults," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 627-641, April.
    3. Robert A. Cummins, 2018. "Subjective Wellbeing as a Social Indicator," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 135(3), pages 879-891, February.
    4. Adrian Tomyn & Robert Cummins & Jacolyn Norrish, 2015. "The Subjective Wellbeing of ‘At-Risk’ Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australian Adolescents," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 813-837, August.
    5. Adam Sulkowski & D. Steven White, 2016. "A happiness Kuznets curve? Using model-based cluster analysis to group countries based on happiness, development, income, and carbon emissions," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 1095-1111, August.
    6. Tanja Capic & Ning Li & Robert A. Cummins, 2018. "Confirmation of Subjective Wellbeing Set-Points: Foundational for Subjective Social Indicators," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 137(1), pages 1-28, May.
    7. Melissa K. Weinberg & Nicola Heath & Adrian J. Tomyn, 2016. "Rebound or Resignation: Developing a Predictive Model of Return to Subjective Wellbeing Set-Point," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 1565-1575, August.
    8. Elizabeth Holmes-Truscott & Jessica L. Browne & Frans Pouwer & Jane Speight & Robert A. Cummins, 2016. "Subjective Wellbeing Among Adults with Diabetes: Results from Diabetes MILES—Australia," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 1205-1217, June.
    9. Bryson, Alex & MacKerron, George, 2018. "How Does Terrorism Affect Individuals' Wellbeing?," IZA Discussion Papers 11273, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Adrian Tomyn & Melissa Weinberg & Robert Cummins, 2015. "Intervention Efficacy Among ‘At Risk’ Adolescents: A Test of Subjective Wellbeing Homeostasis Theory," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 120(3), pages 883-895, February.
    11. Bjørn Grinde, 2016. "Why Negative Feelings are Important when Assessing Well-Being," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 1741-1752, August.
    12. Elias Soukiazis & Sara Ramos, 2016. "The Structure of Subjective Well-Being and Its Determinants: A Micro-Data Study for Portugal," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(3), pages 1375-1399, April.
    13. Chang-ming Hsieh, 2017. "Health, Quality of Homecare Services and Quality of Life: A Case of Frail Older Immigrant Adults," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 134(2), pages 711-723, November.
    14. Ning Li, 2014. "Multidimensionality of Longitudinal Data: Unlocking the Age-Happiness Puzzle," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n04, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    15. Sophie Hentschel & Michael Eid & Tanja Kutscher, 2017. "The Influence of Major Life Events and Personality Traits on the Stability of Affective Well-Being," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 719-741, June.

  4. John B. Carlin & Ning Li & Philip Greenwood & Carolyn Coffey, 2003. "Tools for analyzing multiple imputed datasets," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 3(3), pages 226-244, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Väisänen, Heini & Murphy, Michael J., 2014. "Social inequalities in teenage fertility outcomes: childbearing and abortion trends of three birth cohorts in Finland," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 56660, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Jue Yang & Shunsuke Managi & Masayuki Sato, 2015. "The effect of institutional quality on national wealth: an examination using multiple imputation method," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 17(3), pages 431-453, July.
    3. John Bound & Michael F. Lovenheim & Sarah Turner, 2010. "Why Have College Completion Rates Declined? An Analysis of Changing Student Preparation and Collegiate Resources," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 129-157, July.
    4. Wesley Eddings & Yulia Marchenko, 2012. "Diagnostics for multiple imputation in Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 12(3), pages 353-367, September.
    5. Patrick Royston, 2005. "Multiple imputation of missing values: update," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 5(2), pages 188-201, June.
    6. Johannes Geyer, 2011. "The Effect of Health and Employment Risks on Precautionary Savings," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1167, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Patrick Royston, 2004. "Multiple imputation of missing values," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(3), pages 227-241, September.
    8. John B. Carlin & John C. Galati & Patrick Royston, 2008. "A new framework for managing and analyzing multiply imputed data in Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 8(1), pages 49-67, February.
    9. Gabriele Beissel Durrant, 2009. "Imputation Methods for Handling Item-Nonresponse in the Social Sciences: A Methodological Review," Working Papers id:2007, eSocialSciences.

  5. Ning Li & Guoqi Qian & Richard Huggins, 2002. "Analysis of Between-Household Heterogeneity in Disease Transmission from Data on Outbreak Sizes," Australian & New Zealand Journal of Statistics, Australian Statistical Publishing Association Inc., vol. 44(4), pages 401-411, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Li, Ning & Qian, Guoqi & Huggins, Richard, 2006. "A latent variable model for estimating disease transmission rate from data on household outbreaks," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 50(11), pages 3354-3368, July.

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