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Andrew Ellis

Personal Details

First Name:Andrew
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ellis
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pel244
http://personal.lse.ac.uk/ellisa1/

Affiliation

Economics Department
London School of Economics (LSE)

London, United Kingdom
http://econ.lse.ac.uk/

: +44 (0)20 7955 7545
+44 (0)20 7831 1840
Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE
RePEc:edi:edlseuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Ellis, Andrew, 2017. "Foundations for optimal inattention," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85334, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Ellis, Andrew & Piccione, Michele, 2017. "Correlation misperception in choice," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 68326, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

Articles

  1. Ellis, Andrew, 2018. "On dynamic consistency in ambiguous games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 241-249.
  2. Ellis, Andrew, 2018. "Foundations for optimal inattention," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 56-94.
  3. Andrew Ellis & Michele Piccione, 2017. "Correlation Misperception in Choice," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(4), pages 1264-1292, April.
  4. Ellis, Andrew, 2016. "Condorcet meets Ellsberg," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 11(3), September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Ellis, Andrew, 2017. "Foundations for optimal inattention," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85334, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Nick Saponara, 2018. "Bayesian optimism," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 66(2), pages 375-406, August.
    2. de Oliveira, Henrique & Denti, Tommaso & Mihm, Maximilian & Ozbek, Kemal, 2017. "Rationally inattentive preferences and hidden information costs," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 12(2), May.
    3. Luciano Pomatto & Philipp Strack & Omer Tamuz, 2018. "The cost of information," Papers 1812.04211, arXiv.org, revised Feb 2019.
    4. Frick, Mira, 2016. "Monotone threshold representations," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 11(3), September.
    5. Gabaix, Xavier, 2018. "Behavioral Inattention," CEPR Discussion Papers 13268, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Sinclair-Desgagné, Bernard, 2019. "Prior knowledge and monotone decision problems," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 175(C), pages 15-18.
    7. Daniele Pennesi, 2015. "Costly information acquisition and the temporal resolution of uncertainty," THEMA Working Papers 2015-01, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    8. Matthew Gibson & Jamie T. Mullins & Alison Hill, 2019. "Climate Risk and Beliefs: Evidence from New York Floodplains," Department of Economics Working Papers 2019-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    9. Faruk Gul & Wolfgang Pesendorfer & Tomasz Strzalecki, 2017. "Coarse Competitive Equilibrium and Extreme Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(1), pages 109-137, January.
    10. Tsakas, Elias, 2018. "Robust scoring rules," Research Memorandum 023, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
    11. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean, 2014. "Revealed Preference, Rational Inattention, and Costly Information Acquisition," NBER Working Papers 19876, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Mackowiak, Bartosz Adam & Matejka, Filip & Wiederholt, Mirko, 2018. "Survey: Rational Inattention, a Disciplined Behavioral Model," CEPR Discussion Papers 13243, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Jawwad Noor & Norio Takeoka, "undated". "Impatience as Selfishness," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2018-008, Boston University - Department of Economics.

  2. Ellis, Andrew & Piccione, Michele, 2017. "Correlation misperception in choice," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 68326, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Larry G. Epstein & Yoram Halevy, 2017. "Ambiguous Correlation," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2017-006, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    2. Mira Frick & Ryota Iijima & Yuhta Ishii, 2018. "Dispersed Behavior and Perceptions in Assortative Societies," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 2128R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Mar 2019.

Articles

  1. Ellis, Andrew, 2018. "On dynamic consistency in ambiguous games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 241-249.

    Cited by:

    1. Galanis, S., 2019. "Dynamic Consistency, Valuable Information and Subjective Beliefs," Working Papers 19/02, Department of Economics, City University London.
    2. Pahlke, Marieke, 2018. "Dynamic Consistency in Incomplete Information Games with Multiple Priors," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 599, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
    3. Eran Hanany & Peter Klibanoff & Sujoy Mukerji, 2018. "Incomplete Information Games with Ambiguity Averse Players," Working Papers 868, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.

  2. Ellis, Andrew, 2018. "Foundations for optimal inattention," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 56-94.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Andrew Ellis & Michele Piccione, 2017. "Correlation Misperception in Choice," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(4), pages 1264-1292, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Ellis, Andrew, 2016. "Condorcet meets Ellsberg," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 11(3), September.

    Cited by:

    1. Addison Pan, 2019. "A Note on Pivotality," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-8, June.
    2. David Dillenberger & Colin Raymond, 2016. "Group-Shift and the Consensus Effect, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 16-015, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 30 Sep 2016.
    3. Charles F. Manski, 2013. "Status Quo Deference and Policy Choice under Ambiguity," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 169(1), pages 116-128, March.
    4. Ellis, Andrew, 2018. "On dynamic consistency in ambiguous games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 241-249.
    5. Ginzburg, Boris, 2017. "Sincere voting in an electorate with heterogeneous preferences," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 120-123.
    6. Benjamin Lockwood, 2015. "Voter Confirmation Bias and Electoral Accountability," CESifo Working Paper Series 5415, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Lockwood, Ben & Rockey, James, 2015. "Negative Voters: Electoral Competition with Loss-Aversion," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1063, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    8. Lockwood, Ben, 2017. "Confirmation Bias and Electoral Accountability," CEPR Discussion Papers 11772, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Daiki Kishishita, 2018. "Emergence of populism under ambiguity," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 25(6), pages 1559-1562, December.
    10. Ellis, Andrew, 2016. "Condorcet meets Ellsberg," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 11(3), September.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (2) 2016-12-04 2019-05-06. Author is listed
  2. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (2) 2016-12-04 2019-05-06. Author is listed
  3. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2019-05-06. Author is listed
  4. NEP-ORE: Operations Research (1) 2019-05-06. Author is listed

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