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Voting on tricky questions

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  • Tajika, Tomoya

Abstract

We study a common-value voting model, in which private signal is typically informative but may be unreliable. Reliability determines the precision and the meaning of voters' private signals. These private signals are negatively correlated between different reliabilities. Each voter also receives noisy signals about reliability itself. When the population is sufficiently large, a bad equilibrium exists, in which all voters ignore reliability signals. It is thus possible that, at equilibrium, the majority rule makes an incorrect decision with a probability close to one.

Suggested Citation

  • Tajika, Tomoya, 2022. "Voting on tricky questions," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 380-389.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:gamebe:v:132:y:2022:i:c:p:380-389
    DOI: 10.1016/j.geb.2022.01.008
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Information aggregation; Inefficiency; Precision uncertainty; Strategic voting;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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