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Bassam Abu El-Foul

Personal Details

First Name:Bassam
Middle Name:
Last Name:Abu El-Foul
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pab283
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

(50%) Department of Economics
School of Business Administration
American University of Sharjah

Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
http://www.aus.edu/info/200171/school_of_business_and_management/312/department_of_economics

(971) 6-5055002
(971) 6-585858
(971) 6-5055002
RePEc:edi:deausae (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Economic Research Forum (ERF)

Cairo, Egypt
http://www.erf.org.eg/

(+202) 333 18 600
(+202) 333 18 604
21 Al-Sad Al Aaly St. Dokki, Giza
RePEc:edi:erfaceg (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Bassam Abou al Foul, 2008. "Foreign Aid and Economic Growth in Egypt and Jordan: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 418, Economic Research Forum, revised 06 Jan 2008.
  2. Bassam AbuAl-Foul, "undated". "Military Spending and Economic Growth: Evidence from Jordan," Economics Working Papers 19-04/2014, School of Business Administration, American University of Sharjah.
  3. Bassam AbuAl-Foul, "undated". "Energy Use and Economic Growth in Jordan," Economics Working Papers 05-05/2015, School of Business Administration, American University of Sharjah.
  4. Bassam AbuAl-Foul, "undated". "The Causal Relation between Savings and Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis," Economics Working Papers 06-05/2015, School of Business Administration, American University of Sharjah.
  5. Bassam AbuAl-Foul & Ismail Genc & Musa Darayseh, "undated". "On the Causal Link between Financial Development and Economic Growth: Case of Jordan," Economics Working Papers 18-04/2014, School of Business Administration, American University of Sharjah.

Articles

  1. Baghestani, Hamid & AbuAl-Foul, Bassam M., 2017. "Comparing Federal Reserve, Blue Chip, and time series forecasts of US output growth," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 47-56.
  2. Ismail H Genc & Musa Darayseh & Bassam AbuAl-Foul, 2011. "The Nature of Trends in the Per Capita Real GDP of Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Countries: Some Evidence and Implications," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 45(1), pages 19-33, July-Dece.
  3. Hamid Baghestani & Bassam AbuAl-Foul, 2010. "Factors influencing Federal Reserve forecasts of inflation," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(2), pages 196-207, May.
  4. Hamid Baghestani & Bassam Abual-Foul, 2010. "Evidence on Forecasting Inflation Under Asymmetric Loss," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 55(1), pages 105-110, May.
  5. Bassam M. AbuAl-Foul & Mohamed Soliman, 2008. "Foreign Direct Investment and LDC Exports: Evidence from the MENA Region," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(2), pages 4-14, March.
  6. Bassam Abual-Foul, 2004. "Testing the export-led growth hypothesis: evidence from Jordan," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(6), pages 393-396.
  7. Bassam AbuAl-Foul & Hamid Baghestani, 2004. "The causal relation between government revenue and spending: Evidence from Egypt and Jordan," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 28(2), pages 260-269, June.
  8. Fazlul Miah & M. Kabir Hassan & M. Waheeduzzaman & Bassam Abual-Foul, 2003. "New evidence on the rationality of exchange rate expectation," Global Business and Economics Review, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(2), pages 316-332.

Chapters

  1. Ismail H. Genc & George Naufal & Bassam Abu Al-Foul, 2014. "Female labor force participation in Islamic countries," Chapters, in: M. Kabir Hassan & Mervyn K. Lewis (ed.),Handbook on Islam and Economic Life, chapter 11, pages iii-iii, Edward Elgar Publishing.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Bassam Abou al Foul, 2008. "Foreign Aid and Economic Growth in Egypt and Jordan: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 418, Economic Research Forum, revised 06 Jan 2008.

    Cited by:

    1. Arsalan, Rahmatullah, 2019. "Foreign Aid and Economic Development A study of Foreign Aid and Its Effects and Relationship with Per Capita Income of Afghanistan," MPRA Paper 96136, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Sep 2019.
    2. Hassan, Mai, 2017. "The impact of the shadow economy on aid and economic development nexus in Egypt," MPRA Paper 80990, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Bassam M. AbuAl-Foul & Mohamed Soliman, 2008. "Foreign Direct Investment and LDC Exports: Evidence from the MENA Region," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(2), pages 4-14, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Mustafa Kahveci, 2019. "From Spring to Winter? An Analysis of "Arab Spring" Impacts on Turkey and Mena Region Foreign Trade with Gravity Approach," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 9(12), pages 1320-1334, December.
    2. Godwin Okafor & Jenifer Piesse & Allan Webster, 2017. "FDI Determinants in Least Recipient Regions: The Case of Sub†Saharan Africa and MENA," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 29(4), pages 589-600, December.

  2. Bassam Abual-Foul, 2004. "Testing the export-led growth hypothesis: evidence from Jordan," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(6), pages 393-396.

    Cited by:

    1. Innocent.U.Duru & Uka Ezenwe, 2020. "Empirical Investigation of the Impact of Exports on Economic Growth: Evidence from Nigeria, 1980-2016," International Journal of Publication and Social Studies, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(1), pages 18-43, March.
    2. Per-Ola Maneschiöld, 2008. "A Note on the Export-Led Growth Hypothesis: A Time Series Approach," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 45(132), pages 293-302.
    3. Innocent.U.Duru & Peter Siyan, 2019. "Empirical Investigation of Exports and Economic Growth: Evidence from Sane Countries, 1980-2016," Asian Development Policy Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 7(4), pages 318-354, December.
    4. Isabel Cortés_Jiménez & Manuela Pulina, 2006. "A further step into the ELGH and TLGH for Spain and Italy," Working Papers 2006.118, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    5. Alimi, Santos R. & Muse, Bernard O., 2012. "Export - led growth or growth – driven exports? Evidence from Nigeria," MPRA Paper 53468, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Akmal, Muhammad Shahbaz & Ahmad, Khalil & Ali, Muhammad, 2009. "Exports-Led Growth Hypothesis in Pakistan: Further Evidence," MPRA Paper 16043, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Ben Jebli, Mehdi & Ben Youssef, Slim, 2013. "Combustible renewables and waste consumption, exports and economic growth: Evidence from panel for selected MENA countries," MPRA Paper 47767, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Yaya Keho, 2018. "The Causal Nexus between Exports and Economic Growth: Evidence on the Role of Omitted Variables," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 8(4), pages 335-344.
    9. Hamdi, Helmi, 2013. "Testing Export-led Growth in Tunisia and Morocco: New Evidence using the Toda and Yamamoto procedure," MPRA Paper 65072, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Lemmens, A. & Croux, C. & Dekimpe, M.G., 2004. "Decomposing Granger Causality over the Spectrum," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2004-102-MKT, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    11. Manamba EPAPHRA, 2016. "Determinants of Export Performance in Tanzania," Journal of Economics Library, KSP Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 470-487, September.
    12. Raju GUNTUKULA, 2018. "Exports, imports and economic growth in India: Evidence from cointegration and causality analysis," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(2(615), S), pages 221-230, Summer.
    13. Sheila Amin Gutierrez de Pineres, 2006. "What a difference a source makes! An analysis of export data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 35-39.
    14. Dierk Herzer & Felicitas Nowak-Lehmann D. & Boriss Siliverstovs, 2004. "Export-Led Growth in Chile: Assessing the Role of Export Composition in Productivity Growth," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 103, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    15. Yahya Can DURA & Mustafa Kemal BESER & Hakan ACAROGLU, 2017. "Türkiye’nin Ihracata Dayali Buyumesinin Ekonometrik Analizi," Ege Academic Review, Ege University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, vol. 17(2), pages 295-310.
    16. Oladapo FAPETU & Segun Daniel OWOEYE, 2017. "Testing the validity of the export-led growth hypothesis in Nigeria: Evidence from non-oil and oil exports," Computational Methods in Social Sciences (CMSS), "Nicolae Titulescu" University of Bucharest, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 5(2), pages 41-48, December.
    17. Connie Bayudan-Dacuycuy, 2012. "The Philippine export portfolio in the product space: potentials, possibilities and policy challenges," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(1), pages 59-66.
    18. K. A. Al Mamun & H. K. Nath, 2005. "Export-led growth in Bangladesh: a time series analysis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(6), pages 361-364.
    19. Husein, J, 2010. "Export-Led Growth Hypothesis In The Mena Region: A Multivariate Cointegration, Causality And Stability Analysis," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 10(2).
    20. Salah Abosedra & Chor Foon Tang, 2019. "Are exports a reliable source of economic growth in MENA countries? New evidence from the rolling Granger causality method," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 56(3), pages 831-841, March.
    21. Ferda Halicioglu, 2007. "A Multivariate Causality Analysis of Export and Growth for Turkey," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2007_05, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    22. Lemmens, Aurélie & Croux, Christophe & Dekimpe, Marnik G., 2008. "Measuring and testing Granger causality over the spectrum: An application to European production expectation surveys," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 414-431.
    23. Qazi Muhammad Adnan Hye & Houda Ben Haj Boubaker, 2011. "Exports, Imports and Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis of Tunisia," The IUP Journal of Monetary Economics, IUP Publications, vol. 0(1), pages 6-21, February.
    24. Isabel Cortes-Jimenez & Manuela Pulina, 2006. "Tourism and Growth: Evidence for Spain and Italy," ERSA conference papers ersa06p128, European Regional Science Association.
    25. Kalaitzi, Athanasia S. & Chamberlain, Trevor W., 2020. "Merchandise exports and economic growth: multivariate time series analysis for the United Arab Emirates," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 103781, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    26. Bayudan-Dacuycuy, Connie & Lim, Joseph Anthony, 2014. "Export Sophistication and Export-Led Growth: An Analysis of the Export Basket of Selected East Asian Economies," MPRA Paper 64650, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  3. Bassam AbuAl-Foul & Hamid Baghestani, 2004. "The causal relation between government revenue and spending: Evidence from Egypt and Jordan," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 28(2), pages 260-269, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Nanthakumar LOGANATHAN & Suraya ISMAIL & Dalia STREIMIKIENE & Asan Ali Golam HASSAN & Edmundas Kazimieras ZAVADSKAS & Abbas MARDANI, 2017. "Tax Reform, Inflation, Financial Development And Economic Growth In Malaysia," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 152-165, December.
    2. Obeng, Samuel, 2015. "A Causality Test of the Revenue-Expenditure Nexus in Ghana," MPRA Paper 63735, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 25 Feb 2015.
    3. Yaya Keho, 2010. "Spending Cuts or Tax Adjustments: How Can UEMOA Countries Control Their Budget Deficits?," International Journal of Business and Economics, School of Management Development, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 9(3), pages 233-252, December.
    4. Nouran Hussein & Jasmin Fouad, 2020. "When the Art of Macroeconomic Management Confronts the Evolution of Business Cycles: Zooming into the Egyptian Case," International Journal of Business and Management, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences, vol. 8(1), pages 11-34, May.
    5. Omoshoro-Jones, Oyeyinka Sunday, 2020. "Investigating the Government Revenue–Expenditure Nexus: Empirical Evidence for the Free State Province in a Multivariate Model," MPRA Paper 101349, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ARA: MENA - Middle East & North Africa (2) 2015-05-30 2015-05-30
  2. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2015-05-30
  3. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (1) 2015-05-30
  4. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2015-05-30

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