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The Causality between Government Revenue and Government Expenditure in Iran

Author

Listed:
  • Yousef Elyasi

    () (Young Researchers Club, Mahabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mahabad, Iran)

  • Mohammad Rahimi

    () (Faculty of Economics and Social Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran)

Abstract

The causal relationship between government revenue and government expenditure is an important subject in public economics especially to the control of budget deficit. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between government revenue and government expenditure in Iran by applying the bounds testing approach to cointegration. The results of the causality test show that there is a bidirectional causal relationship between government expenditure and revenues in both long run and short run. Therefore, the results of this paper are consistent with fiscal synchronization hypothesis. The policy implication of results suggests that because of existing interdependence relation between government expenditure and revenue, the government makes its expenditures and revenues decision simultaneously. Under this hypothesis, the fiscal authorities of Iran should try to increase revenues and decrease expenditure simultaneously to control the budget deficits.

Suggested Citation

  • Yousef Elyasi & Mohammad Rahimi, 2012. "The Causality between Government Revenue and Government Expenditure in Iran," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 5(1), pages 129-145, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:tei:journl:v:5:y:2012:i:1:p:129-145
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    File URL: http://ijbesar.teiemt.gr/docs/volume5_issue1/causality_iran.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. von Furstenberg, George M & Green, R Jeffrey & Jeong, Jin-Ho, 1986. "Tax and Spend, or Spend and Tax?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(2), pages 179-188, May.
    2. Neelesh Gounder & Paresh Kumar Narayan & Arti Prasad, 2007. "An empirical investigation of the relationship between government revenue and expenditure: The case of the Fiji Islands," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 34(3), pages 147-158, February.
    3. Alan T. Peacock & Jack Wiseman, 1961. "The Growth of Public Expenditure in the United Kingdom," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number peac61-1, January.
    4. Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2010. "Energy consumption, prices and economic growth in three SSA countries: A comparative study," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 2463-2469, May.
    5. Tsangyao Chang & Gengnan Chiang, 2009. "Revisiting the Government Revenue-Expenditure Nexus: Evidence from 15 OECD Countries Based on the Panel Data Approach," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 59(2), pages 165-172, June.
    6. António Afonso & Cristophe Rault, 2008. "Bootstrap Panel Granger-Causality Between Government Spending and Revenue," Working Papers Department of Economics 2008/39, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    7. Kausik Chaudhuri & Bodhisattva Sengupta, 2009. "Revenue-Expenditure Nexus for Southern States: Some Policy Oriented Econometric Observations," Working Papers 2009-048, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
    8. Johansen, Soren, 1995. "Likelihood-Based Inference in Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Models," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774501.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Damian C. NWOSU & Harrison O. OKAFOR, 2014. "Government Revenue and Expenditure in Nigeria: A Disaggregated Analysis," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(7), pages 877-892, July.
    2. Lien, Nguyen Phuong, 2015. "The impact of institutional quality on tax revenue in developing countries," Asian Journal of Empirical Research, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(10), pages 181-195, October.
    3. Obeng, Samuel, 2015. "A Causality Test of the Revenue-Expenditure Nexus in Ghana," MPRA Paper 63735, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 25 Feb 2015.
    4. Adel Shakeeb MOHSEN, 2016. "Effects of oil returns and external debt on the government investment: A case study of Syria," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(1(606), S), pages 255-262, Spring.
    5. Phiri, Andrew, 2016. "Asymmetries in the revenue-expenditure nexus: New evidence from South Africa," MPRA Paper 75224, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Raed A. M. Iriqat & Ahmad N. H. Anabtawi, 2016. "GDP and Tax Revenues-Causality Relationship in Developing Countries: Evidence from Palestine," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 8(4), pages 54-62, April.
    7. repec:seb:journl:v:15:y:2017:i:1:p:47-61 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Government revenue/expenditure; Bounds testing approach; Granger Causality; ARDL;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • H10 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - General
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General

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