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Zsolt Spéder

Personal Details

First Name:Zsolt
Middle Name:
Last Name:Spéder
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psp138
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.demografia.hu/en

Affiliation

KSH Népességtudományi Kutató Intézet (Hungarian Demographic Research Institute)

http://www.demografia.hu/en
Hungary, Budapest

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Editorship

Working papers

  1. Arnstein Aassve & Cristina Ruggeri & Zsolt Sp√àder, 2009. "Life expectancy, economic prosperity and retirement preferences," Working Papers 022, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
  2. Spéder, Zsolt & Habich, Roland, 1999. "Income dynamics in three societies: an investigation of social dynamics using old and new types of social indicators," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Social Structure and Social Reporting FS III 99-402, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
  3. Zsolt Spéder, 1995. "Some Aspects of the Social Transition Processes in Hungary and East Germany: Income Inequality and Poverty," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 104, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Rudolf Andorka & Zsolt Spéder, 1995. "Armut in der Transformation: das Beispiel Ungarn," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 114, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

Articles

  1. Zsolt Spéder & Balázs Kapitány, 2014. "Failure to Realize Fertility Intentions: A Key Aspect of the Post-communist Fertility Transition," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(3), pages 393-418, June.
  2. Balázs Kapitány & Zsolt Spéder & Patrick Festy, 2012. "Réalisation et évolution des intentions de fécondité dans quatre pays européens," Population (french edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 67(4), pages 711-744.
  3. Zsolt Spéder & Ferenc Kamarás, 2008. "Hungary: Secular fertility decline with distinct period fluctuations," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(18), pages 599-664, July.
  4. Andres Vikat & Zsolt Spéder & Gijs Beets & Francesco Billari & Christoph Bühler & Aline Désesquelles & Tineke Fokkema & Jan M. Hoem & Alphonse MacDonald & Gerda Neyer & Ariane Pailhé & Antonella Pinne, 2007. "Generations and Gender Survey (GGS)," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(14), pages 389-440, November.
  5. Zsolt Spéder, 2007. "The diversity of Family structure in Europe: A survey on partnership, parenting and childhood across Europe around the millenium," Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, vol. 50(5), pages 105-134.
  6. Zsolt Spéder, 2006. "Rudiments of recent fertility decline in Hungary," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 15(8), pages 253-288, October.
  7. Zsolt Spéder, 2005. "The rise of cohabitation as first union and some neglected factors of recent demographic developmnets in Hungary," Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, vol. 49(5), pages 77-103.
  8. Marietta Pongrácz & Zsolt Spéder, 2003. "Marriage and cohabitation - Facts and opinions compared," Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, vol. 48(5), pages 54-74.
  9. Zsolt Spéder, 1998. "Poverty dynamics in Hungary during the transformation," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 6(1), pages 1-21, May.
  10. Rudolf Andorka & Zsolt Spéder, 1995. "Armut in der Transformation - das Beispiel Ungarn," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 64(4), pages 656-664.

Editorship

  1. Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Zsolt Spéder & Ferenc Kamarás, 2008. "Hungary: Secular fertility decline with distinct period fluctuations," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(18), pages 599-664, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Zuzanna Brzozowska, 2014. "Fertility and education in Poland during state socialism," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(12), pages 319-336, July.
    2. Nicole Hiekel & Aart Liefbroer & Anne-Rigt Poortman, 2014. "Understanding Diversity in the Meaning of Cohabitation Across Europe," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(4), pages 391-410, November.

  2. Andres Vikat & Zsolt Spéder & Gijs Beets & Francesco Billari & Christoph Bühler & Aline Désesquelles & Tineke Fokkema & Jan M. Hoem & Alphonse MacDonald & Gerda Neyer & Ariane Pailhé & Antonella Pinne, 2007. "Generations and Gender Survey (GGS)," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(14), pages 389-440, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Jenny Gierveld & Pearl Dykstra & Niels Schenk, 2012. "Living arrangements, intergenerational support types and older adult loneliness in Eastern and Western Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(7), pages 167-200, August.
    2. Arnstein Aassve & Bruno Arpino & Alice Goisis, 2012. "Grandparenting and mothers’ labour force participation: A comparative analysis using the Generations and Gender Survey," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(3), pages 53-84, July.
    3. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Monika Mynarska & Daniele Vignoli, 2014. "A Dirty Look From The Neighbors. Does Living In A Religious Neighborhood Prevent Cohabitation?," Working Papers 71, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    4. Jan Eckhard & Johannes Stauder, 2018. "Migration and the Partner Market: How Gender-Selective Relocations Affect Regional Mating Chances in Germany," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 34(1), pages 59-86, February.
    5. Arnaud Régnier-Loilier & Leila Saboni & Béatrice Valdes, 2011. "Presentation and modifications to the generations and gender survey questionnaire in France (wave 2)," Working Papers 173, Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED).
    6. Anna Baranowska-Rataj, 2012. "What would your parents say? The impact of cohabitation on intergenerational relations in traditional societies," Working Papers 50, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    7. Steinbach, Anja & Kuhnt, Anne-Kristin & Knüll, Markus, 2015. "Kern-, Eineltern- und Stieffamilien in Europa: Eine Analyse ihrer Häufigkeit und Einbindung in haushaltsübergreifende Strukturen," Duisburger Beiträge zur soziologischen Forschung 2015-02, University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Sociology.
    8. Eleonora Mussino & Alyson A. van Raalte, 2008. "Fertility of migrants: a comparative study between Italy and Russia," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2008-026, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    9. Aart C. Liefbroer, 2011. "On the usefulness of the Theory of Planned Behaviour for fertility research," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 9(1), pages 55-62.
    10. Tomáš Sobotka & Laurent Toulemon, 2008. "Overview Chapter 4: Changing family and partnership behaviour," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(6), pages 85-138, July.
    11. Aart C. Liefbroer & Anne-Rigt Poortman & Judith Seltzer, 2015. "Why do intimate partners live apart? Evidence on LAT relationships across Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(8), pages 251-286, January.
    12. Arnaud Régnier-Loilier & Daniele Vignoli, 2014. "Similar incidence, different nature? Characteristics of Living Apart Together relationships in France and Italy," Econometrics Working Papers Archive 2014_11, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".
    13. Alzbeta Mullerova, 2017. "Workers or mothers? Czech welfare and gender role preferences in transition," EconomiX Working Papers 2017-6, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    14. Thomas Hansen & Britt Slagsvold & Reidun Ingebretsen, 2013. "The Strains and Gains of Caregiving: An Examination of the Effects of Providing Personal Care to a Parent on a Range of Indicators of Psychological Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 114(2), pages 323-343, November.
    15. Roberto Impicciatore, 2015. "The Transition to Adulthood of the Italian Second Generation in France," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 31(5), pages 529-560, December.
    16. FFF1Francesco NNN1Billari, 2004. "Becoming an Adult in Europe: A Macro(/Micro)-Demographic Perspective," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(2), pages 15-44, April.
    17. Magdalena Muszyńska, 2008. "Women’s employment and union dissolution in a changing socio-economic context in Russia," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 18(6), pages 181-204, April.
    18. Heather M. Rackin & Christine A. Bachrach, 2016. "Assessing the Predictive Value of Fertility Expectations Through a Cognitive–Social Model," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(4), pages 527-551, August.
    19. Zsolt Spéder & Balázs Kapitány, 2014. "Failure to Realize Fertility Intentions: A Key Aspect of the Post-communist Fertility Transition," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(3), pages 393-418, June.
    20. Ina Berninger & Bernd Weiß & Michael Wagner, 2011. "On the links between employment, partnership quality, and the desire to have a first child," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 24(24), pages 579-610, April.
    21. Magdalena Muszyńska & Hill Kulu, 2007. "Migration and union dissolution in a changing socio-economic context," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(27), pages 803-820, December.
    22. Arnaud Régnier-Loilier, 2010. "Présentation, questionnaire et documentation de la seconde vague de l'"Etude des relations familiales et intergénérationnelles" (ERFI-GGS 2)," Working Papers 165, Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED).
    23. Pearl Dykstra & Aafke Komter, 2012. "Generational interdependencies in families," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(18), pages 487-506, October.
    24. Olivier Thevenon, 2009. "Does fertility respond to work and family reconciliation policies in France?," Working Papers hal-00424832, HAL.
    25. Christoph Bühler & Dirk Konietzka, 2008. "The transition from school to work in Russia during and after socialism: change or continuity?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2008-018, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

  3. Zsolt Spéder, 2006. "Rudiments of recent fertility decline in Hungary," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 15(8), pages 253-288, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Jan M. Hoem & Aiva Jasilioniene & Dora Kostova & Cornelia Mureşan, 2007. "Traces of the Second Demographic Transition in four selected countries in Central and Eastern Europe: union formation as a demographic manifestation," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2007-026, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

  4. Zsolt Spéder, 2005. "The rise of cohabitation as first union and some neglected factors of recent demographic developmnets in Hungary," Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, vol. 49(5), pages 77-103.

    Cited by:

    1. Kalev Katus & Asta Põldma & Allan Puur & Luule Sakkeus, 2007. "First union formation in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania: patterns across countries and gender," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(10), pages 247-300, November.

  5. Zsolt Spéder, 1998. "Poverty dynamics in Hungary during the transformation," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 6(1), pages 1-21, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Molnár, György & Kapitány, Zsuzsa, 2002. "Egyenlőtlenség és mobilitás a magyar háztartások jövedelmében, kiadásaiban és tartós fogyasztási cikkeinek állományában
      [Inequality and mobility in the income, expenditures and consumer-durable sto
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(12), pages 1015-1041.
    2. Zsuzsa Kapitany & Gyorgy Molnar, 2002. "Inequality and mobility analysis by the Hungarian Rotation Panel, 1993-98," IEHAS Discussion Papers 0204, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    3. Lokshin Michael & Ravallion Martin, 2004. "Household Income Dynamics in Two Transition Economies," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(3), pages 1-33, September.
    4. Rosser, J. Jr. & Rosser, Marina V. & Ahmed, Ehsan, 2000. "Income Inequality and the Informal Economy in Transition Economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 156-171, March.
    5. Spryskov Dmitry, 2003. "Below the Poverty Line: Duration of Poverty in Russia," EERC Working Paper Series 03-04e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2010-03-28
  2. NEP-EEC: European Economics (1) 2010-03-28
  3. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2010-03-28
  4. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (1) 2010-03-28
  5. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2010-03-28
  6. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2010-03-28

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