IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/dem/wpaper/wp-2008-018.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The transition from school to work in Russia during and after socialism: change or continuity?

Author

Listed:
  • Christoph Bühler

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Dirk Konietzka

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

Russia. It compares the process of entering working life during socialism (1966-1990) and the transition period (1991-2005) by utilizing information from 6,455 males and females of the "Education and Employment Survey for Russia". The results document influences both of change and of continuity. The introduction of labor markets and a mismatch between qualifications acquired at school and demanded by employers led to increasing risks of unemployment after education and first jobs at the lower levels of the occupational hierarchy. However, as the general character of the educational system and the internal structures of many firms did not change, traditional paths of mobility from educational degrees to particular occupational positions continued to exist. Thus, the transition from school-to-work in Russia did not experience an abrupt change but a gradual adjustment to the new economic order.

Suggested Citation

  • Christoph Bühler & Dirk Konietzka, 2008. "The transition from school to work in Russia during and after socialism: change or continuity?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2008-018, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2008-018
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2008-018.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kennedy, Robert E., 1997. "A tale of two economies: Economic restructuring in post-socialist Poland," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 841-865, June.
    2. John M. Litwack, 1991. "Legality and Market Reform in Soviet-Type Economies," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 77-89, Fall.
    3. Hildegard Brauns & Markus Gangl & Stefani Scherer, 1999. "Education and Unemployment: Patterns of Labour Market Entry in France, the United Kingdom and Germany," MZES Working Papers 6, MZES.
    4. Markus Gangl, 2000. "European Perspectives on Labour Market Entry : A Matter of Institutional Linkages between Training Systems and Labour Markets?," MZES Working Papers 24, MZES.
    5. Andres Vikat & Zsolt Spéder & Gijs Beets & Francesco Billari & Christoph Bühler & Aline Désesquelles & Tineke Fokkema & Jan M. Hoem & Alphonse MacDonald & Gerda Neyer & Ariane Pailhé & Antonella Pinne, 2007. "Generations and Gender Survey (GGS)," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(14), pages 389-440, November.
    6. Jan Svejnar, 1991. "Microeconomic Issues in the Transition to a Market Economy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 123-138, Fall.
    7. Eyraud, Francois & Marsden, David & Silvestre, Jean-Jacques, 1990. "Occupational and internal labour markets in Britain and France," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 21305, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Stefani Scherer, 2004. "Stepping-Stones or Traps?," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 18(2), pages 369-394, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Russian Federation; early adulthood; educational systems; employment; occupational qualifications; transitional society; unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2008-018. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Wilhelm). General contact details of provider: https://www.demogr.mpg.de/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.