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the Transition Process in China: A theoretic and empirical Study

Author

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  • Chen Pu

    (University Bielefeld)

  • Hsiao Chihying

    (University Bielefeld)

Abstract

In this paper we analyse the driving forces of the transition from plan to market in China. A two segments and two sectors model is constructed to take into account the particular economic situation in China during the transition process: a large agricultural sector and an industrial sector; a large centrally planned segment and a market segment. The transition from plan to market is described by the increasing share the market segment in the whole economy on the one hand and the forced adjustment of the behaviour of the planned segment to the market situation on the other. Thus this model provides a well structured way to understand the complex phenomenon during the transition process and to analysis the driving forces of the transition process.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen Pu & Hsiao Chihying, 2005. "the Transition Process in China: A theoretic and empirical Study," Development and Comp Systems 0507007, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0507007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wojciech Charemza & Richard E. Quandt, 1982. "Models and Estimation of Disequilibrium for Centrally Planned Economies," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(1), pages 109-116.
    2. Ericson, Richard E., 1984. "The "second economy" and resource allocation under central planning," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 1-24, March.
    3. Jefferson, Gary H. & Xu, Wenyi, 1991. "The impact of reform on socialist enterprises in transition: Structure, conduct, and performance in Chinese industry," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 45-64, March.
    4. Zhou, Huizhong, 1992. "An explanation of coexistence of taut planning and hidden reserves in centrally planned economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 456-478, September.
    5. Panagariya, Arvind, 1990. "The parallel market in centrally planned economies: A dynamic analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 353-371, September.
    6. Jinglian, Wu & Renwei, Zhao, 1987. "The dual pricing system in China's industry," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 309-318, September.
    7. Woo Wing Thye, 1994. "The Art of Reforming Centrally Planned Economies: Comparing China, Poland, and Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 276-308, June.
    8. Naughton, Barry, 1990. "China's experience with guidance planning," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 743-767, December.
    9. Peter Murrell, 1991. "Can Neoclassical Economics Underpin the Reform of Centrally Planned Economies?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 59-76, Fall.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pu Chen & Chih-Ying Hsiao, 2007. "The Transition Process In China: An Economic Development Perspective," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 32(2), pages 113-134, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transition; Economic reform; Industrialization; Chinese economy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies

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