IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/phl19.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Sandile Hlatshwayo

Personal Details

First Name:Sandile
Middle Name:
Last Name:Hlatshwayo
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:phl19
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.sandile.com
Twitter: @femme_economics

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of California-Berkeley

Berkeley, California (United States)
http://emlab.berkeley.edu/econ/

: 510-642-0822
510-642-6615
549 Evans Hall # 3880, Berkeley, CA 94720-3880
RePEc:edi:debrkus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Sandile Hlatshwayo & Magnus Saxegaard, 2016. "The Consequences of Policy Uncertainty; Disconnects and Dilutions in the South African Real Effective Exchange Rate-Export Relationship," IMF Working Papers 16/113, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Matthew Clair & Peter Blair Henry & Sandile Hlatshwayo, 2014. "Two Tales of Entrepreneurship: Barbados, Jamaica, and the 1973 Oil Price Shock," Working Papers 14-03, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Sandile Hlatshwayo & Michael Spence, 2014. "Demand and Defective Growth Patterns: The Role of the Tradable and Non-tradable Sectors in an Open Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 272-277, May.
  2. Michael Spence & Sandile Hlatshwayo, 2012. "The Evolving Structure of the American Economy and the Employment Challenge," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 54(4), pages 703-738, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Sandile Hlatshwayo & Magnus Saxegaard, 2016. "The Consequences of Policy Uncertainty; Disconnects and Dilutions in the South African Real Effective Exchange Rate-Export Relationship," IMF Working Papers 16/113, International Monetary Fund.

    Cited by:

    1. Ansgar Belke & Dominik Kronen, 2017. "Exchange Rate Bands of Inaction and Hysteresis in EU Exports to the Global Economy – The Role of Uncertainty," ROME Working Papers 201705, ROME Network.
    2. Elif C. Arbatli & Steven J. Davis & Arata Ito & Naoko Miake, 2017. "Policy Uncertainty In Japan," NBER Working Papers 23411, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Nasha Maveé & Roberto Perrelli & Axel Schimmelpfennig, 2016. "Surprise, Surprise; What Drives the Rand / U.S. Dollar Exchange Rate Volatility?," IMF Working Papers 16/205, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Esin Cakan & Riza Demirer & Rangan Gupta & Josine Uwilingiye, 2019. "Economic Policy Uncertainty and Herding Behavior Evidence from the South African Housing Market," Advances in Decision Sciences, Asia University, Taiwan, vol. 23(1), pages 88-113, March.
    5. Christina Christou & Rangan Gupta & Christis Hassapis & Tahir Suleman, 2018. "The role of economic uncertainty in forecasting exchange rate returns and realized volatility: Evidence from quantile predictive regressions," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 37(7), pages 705-719, November.
    6. Chris Redl, 2015. "Macroeconomic Uncertainty in South Africa," Working Papers 509, Economic Research Southern Africa.

Articles

  1. Sandile Hlatshwayo & Michael Spence, 2014. "Demand and Defective Growth Patterns: The Role of the Tradable and Non-tradable Sectors in an Open Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 272-277, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Joerg Mayer, 2017. "How Could the South Respond to Secular Stagnation in the North?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 314-335, February.
    2. Sophie Piton, 2018. "Do Unit Labor Costs Matter? A Decomposition Exercise on European Data," Working Papers halshs-01785345, HAL.
    3. Chama CHIPETA & Daniel Francois MEYER, 2018. "Trade Openness, FDI and Exchange Rate Effects on Job Creation in South Africa's Tradable Sectors," Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, AMH International, vol. 10(4), pages 197-212.
    4. Ron Jarmin & CJ Krizan & Adela Luque, 2016. "Small Business Growth and Failure during the Great Recession: The Role of House Prices, Race & Gender," CARRA Working Papers 2016-08, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    5. Philippe Frocrain & Pierre-Noël Giraud, 2017. "The evolution of tradable and non-tradable employment: evidence from France," Working Papers hal-01695159, HAL.
    6. Philippe Frocrain & Pierre-Noël Giraud, 2018. "The Evolution of Tradable and Non Tradable Employment: Evidence from France," Economie et Statistique / Economics and Statistics, Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques (INSEE), issue 503-504, pages 97-107.
    7. Sophie Piton, 2017. "Economic Integration and the Non-tradable Sector: The European Experience," 2017 Papers ppi361, Job Market Papers.
    8. Philippe Frocrain & Pierre-Noël Giraud, 2019. "The Evolution of Tradable and Non Tradable Employment: Evidence from France," Post-Print hal-01981428, HAL.

  2. Michael Spence & Sandile Hlatshwayo, 2012. "The Evolving Structure of the American Economy and the Employment Challenge," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 54(4), pages 703-738, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Naude, Wim & Nagler, Paula, 2015. "Industrialisation, Innovation, Inclusion," MERIT Working Papers 043, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Alan B. Krueger, 2015. "Understanding differences in job growth in Europe, Canada and the United States: what went wrong in the United States?," Chapters, in: John Karl Scholz & Hyungypo Moon & Sang-Hyup Lee (ed.), Social Policies in an Age of Austerity, chapter 4, pages 83-104, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Reis, Anabela & Heitor, Manuel & Amaral, Miguel & Mendonça, Joana, 2016. "Revisiting industrial policy: Lessons learned from the establishment of an automotive OEM in Portugal," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 113(PB), pages 195-205.
    4. João Amador & Ana Cristina Soares, 2017. "Markups and bargaining power in tradable and non-tradable sectors," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 53(2), pages 669-694, September.
    5. Lutz Arnold & Stefanie Trepl, 2015. "A North-South Trade Model of Offshoring and Unemployment," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 26(5), pages 999-1039, November.
    6. Thomas Kemeny & Taner Osman, 2018. "The Wider Impacts of High-Technology Employment: Evidence from U.S. Cities," Working Papers 89, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
    7. Michele Benvenuti & Luca Casolaro & Elena Gennari, 2014. "Metrics of Innovation: Measuring the Italian Gap," Politica economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 5-50.
    8. Chen, Liming & Felipe, Jesus & Kam, Andrew J.Y. & Mehta, Aashish, 2018. "Is Employment Globalizing?," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 556, Asian Development Bank.
    9. Haifang Huang & Yao Tang, 2016. "How Did Exchange Rates Affect Employment In U.S. Cities?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(4), pages 678-697, October.
    10. Korkut Alp Erturk, 2019. "Where Did Good Jobs Go? Acemoglu and Marx on Induced (Skill Replacing) Technical Change," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2019_02, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
    11. Elise S. Brezis & Gilad Brand, 2018. "Productivity Gap between Sectors and Double Duality in Labor Markets," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 725-749, September.
    12. Elise S. Brezis, 2018. "Elitism in Higher Education and Inequality: Why Are the Nordic Countries So Special?," Working Papers 2018-03, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    13. Arvind Subramanian & Martin Kessler, 2013. "The Hyperglobalization of Trade and Its Future," Working Paper Series WP13-6, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    14. Angjellari-Dajci, Fiorentina & Cebula, Richard & Boylan, Robert & Borg, Rody, 2015. "Uncovering Hidden Industry Linkages in Northeast Florida’s Regional Economy: The Case for Export Expansion in Florida’s Fourth Largest MSA," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 45(2).
    15. Thor Berger & Carl Benedikt Frey, 2016. "Structural Transformation in the OECD: Digitalisation, Deindustrialisation and the Future of Work," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 193, OECD Publishing.
    16. Bellmann, Lutz & Gerner, Hans-Dieter & Hübler, Olaf, 2013. "Investment under Company-Level Pacts," IZA Discussion Papers 7195, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Kemeny, Thomas & Osman, Taner, 2017. "The wider impacts of high-technology employment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 101854, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    18. Mealy, Penny & Farmer, J. Doyne & Hausmann, Ricardo, 2018. "Determining the Differences that Matter: Development and Divergence in US States over 1850-2010," Working Paper Series rwp18-030, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    19. Korkut Erturk, 2015. "Economics of Unlimited Supply of Labor and Asymmetric Power," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2015_01, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
    20. Isidro Soloaga & Mariana Pereira, 2013. "Local Multipliers and the Informal Sector in Mexico 2000-2010," Working Papers 0513, Universidad Iberoamericana, Department of Economics.
    21. Sandile Hlatshwayo & Michael Spence, 2014. "Demand and Defective Growth Patterns: The Role of the Tradable and Non-tradable Sectors in an Open Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 272-277, May.
    22. J. David Richardson & Asha Sundaram, 2013. "Sizing Up US Export Disincentives for a New Generation of National-Security Export Controls," Policy Briefs PB13-13, Peterson Institute for International Economics.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2014-02-02. Author is listed
  2. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (1) 2014-02-02. Author is listed
  3. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2016-09-11. Author is listed

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Sandile Hlatshwayo should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.