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Emmanuel Apergis
(Εμμανουήλ Απέργης)

Personal Details

First Name:Emmanuel
Middle Name:
Last Name:Apergis
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pap56

Affiliation

Business School
University of Huddersfield

Huddersfield, United Kingdom
http://www2.hud.ac.uk/uhbs/




RePEc:edi:ebhuduk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Apergis, Emmanuel & Apergis, Iraklis & Apergis, Nicholas, 2019. "A new macro stress testing approach for financial realignment in the Eurozone," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 52-80.
  2. Emmanuel Apergis & Nicholas Apergis, 2019. "“Sakura” has not grown in a day: infrastructure investment and economic growth in Japan under different tax regimes," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 57(2), pages 541-567, August.
  3. Emmanuel Apergis & Nicholas Apergis, 2018. "What is extracted from earth is gold: are rare earths telling a new tale to economic growth?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 45(1), pages 177-192, January.
  4. Emmanuel Apergis & Nicholas Apergis, 2017. "The role of rare earth prices for consumer prices: an ignored factor?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(59), pages 5890-5894, December.
  5. Emmanuel Apergis & Nicholas Apergis, 2017. "The impact of 11/13 Paris terrorist attacks on stock prices: evidence from the international defence industry," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 45-48, January.
  6. Apergis, Emmanuel & Apergis, Nicholas, 2017. "US political corruption: Identifying the channels of bribes for firms' financial policies," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 87-94.
  7. Apergis, Emmanuel & Apergis, Nicholas, 2017. "The role of rare earth prices in renewable energy consumption: The actual driver for a renewable energy world," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 33-42.
  8. Apergis, Emmanuel & Apergis, Nicholas, 2016. "The 11/13 Paris terrorist attacks and stock prices: The case of the international defense industry," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 186-192.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Emmanuel Apergis & Nicholas Apergis, 2017. "The impact of 11/13 Paris terrorist attacks on stock prices: evidence from the international defence industry," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 45-48, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Jamal Bouoiyour & Refk Selmi, 2019. "The Financial Costs of Terror: Evidence from Berlin and Munich Attacks," Post-Print hal-02108636, HAL.
    2. Daniel Castillo & Joseph Falzon, 2018. "An Analysis of the Impact of WannaCry Cyberattack on Cybersecurity Stock Returns," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 13, pages 93-100, August.
    3. Apergis, Emmanuel & Apergis, Iraklis & Apergis, Nicholas, 2019. "A new macro stress testing approach for financial realignment in the Eurozone," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 52-80.

  2. Apergis, Emmanuel & Apergis, Nicholas, 2017. "The role of rare earth prices in renewable energy consumption: The actual driver for a renewable energy world," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 33-42.

    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Yufeng & Zheng, Biao & Qu, Fang, 2020. "Modeling the nexus of crude oil, new energy and rare earth in China: An asymmetric VAR-BEKK (DCC)-GARCH approach," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    2. Emmanuel Apergis & Nicholas Apergis, 2018. "What is extracted from earth is gold: are rare earths telling a new tale to economic growth?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 45(1), pages 177-192, January.
    3. Yufeng Chen & Biao Zheng, 2019. "What Happens after the Rare Earth Crisis: A Systematic Literature Review," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(5), pages 1-26, March.
    4. Caner Özdurak & Veysel Ulusoy, 2020. "Spillovers from the Slowdown in China on Financial and Energy Markets: An Application of VAR–VECH–TARCH Models," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-17, August.

  3. Apergis, Emmanuel & Apergis, Nicholas, 2016. "The 11/13 Paris terrorist attacks and stock prices: The case of the international defense industry," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 186-192.

    Cited by:

    1. Park, Jin Suk & Newaz, Mohammad Khaleq, 2018. "Do terrorist attacks harm financial markets? A meta-analysis of event studies and the determinants of adverse impact," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 227-247.
    2. Godwin Olasehinde-Williams & Mehmet Balcilar, 2018. "The Long-run Effect of Geopolitical Risks on Insurance Premiums," Working Papers 15-44, Eastern Mediterranean University, Department of Economics.
    3. El Ouadghiri, Imane & Peillex, Jonathan, 2018. "Public attention to “Islamic terrorism” and stock market returns," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 936-946.
    4. Gupta, Rangan & Majumdar, Anandamayee & Pierdzioch, Christian & Wohar, Mark E., 2017. "Do terror attacks predict gold returns? Evidence from a quantile-predictive-regression approach," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 276-284.
    5. Fatma Ben Moussa & Mariem Talbi, 2019. "Stock Market Reaction to Terrorist Attacks and Political Uncertainty: Empirical Evidence from the Tunisian Stock Exchange," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 9(3), pages 48-64.
    6. Gok, Ibrahim Yasar & Demirdogen, Yavuz & Topuz, Sefa, 2020. "The impacts of terrorism on Turkish equity market: An investigation using intraday data," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 540(C).
    7. Nicholas Apergis & Matteo Bonato & Rangan Gupta & Clement Kyei, 2016. "Does Geopolitical Risks Predict Stock Returns and Volatility of Leading Defense Companies? Evidence from a Nonparametric Approach," Working Papers 201671, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    8. Simplice A. Asongu & Joseph Nnanna & Nicholas Biekpe & Paul N. Acha-Anyi, 2018. "Contemporary Drivers of Global Tourism: Evidence from Terrorism and Peace Factors," AFEA Working Papers 18/039, African Finance and Economic Association (AFEA).
    9. Jamal Bouoiyour & Refk Selmi, 2019. "The Financial Costs of Terror: Evidence from Berlin and Munich Attacks," Post-Print hal-02108636, HAL.
    10. Mnasri, Ayman & Nechi, Salem, 2016. "Impact of terrorist attacks on stock market volatility in emerging markets," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 184-202.
    11. Muhammad Imran & Mengyun Wu & Shuibin Gu & Shah Saud & Muhammad Abbas, 2019. "Influence of economic and non-economic factors on firm level equity premium: Evidence from Pakistan," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(3), pages 1774-1785.

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