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Low Carbon, High Growth : Latin American Responses to Climate Change - An Overview

Author

Listed:
  • Augusto de la Torre
  • Pablo Fajnzylber
  • John Nash

Abstract

Based on analysis of recent data on the evolution of global temperatures, snow and ice covers, and sea level rise, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has recently declared that "warming of the climate system is unequivocal." Global surface temperatures, in particular, have increased during the past 50 years at twice the speed observed during the first half of the 20th century. The IPCC has also concluded that with 95 percent certainty the main drivers of the observed changes in the global climate have been anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases (GHG). While the greenhouse effect is a natural process without which the planet would probably be too cold to support life, most of the increase in the overall concentration of GHGs observed since the industrial revolution has been the result of human activities, namely the burning of fossil fuels, changes in land use (conversion of forests into agricultural land), and agriculture (the use of nitrogen fertilizers and live stock related methane emissions).

Suggested Citation

  • Augusto de la Torre & Pablo Fajnzylber & John Nash, 2009. "Low Carbon, High Growth : Latin American Responses to Climate Change - An Overview," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 3022.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:3022
    as

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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/3022/476040PUB0Low0101Official0Use0Only1.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Binswanger, Hans P, 1993. "Wealth, Weather Risk and the Composition and Profitability of Agricultural Investments," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(416), pages 56-78, January.
    2. Dasgupta, Susmita & Laplante, Benoit & Meisner, Craig & Wheeler, David & Jianping Yan, 2007. "The impact of sea level rise on developing countries : a comparative analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4136, The World Bank.
    3. Céline Charvériat, 2000. "Natural Disasters in Latin America and the Caribbean: An Overview of Risk," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6793, Inter-American Development Bank.
    4. Aldy, Joseph E. & Ley, Eduardo & Parry, Ian W.H., 2008. "A Tax-Based Approach to Slowing Global Climate Change," Discussion Papers dp-08-26, Resources For the Future.
    5. Isabelle Huault & V. Perret & S. Charreire-Petit, 2007. "Management," Post-Print halshs-00337676, HAL.
    6. Aldy, Joseph E. & Ley, Eduardo & Parry, Ian, 2008. "A Tax–Based Approach to Slowing Global Climate Change," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 61(3), pages 493-517, September.
    7. William R. Cline, 2007. "Global Warming and Agriculture: Impact Estimates by Country," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 4037.
    8. Alaimo, Veronica & Lopez, Humberto, 2008. "Oil intensities and oil prices : evidence for Latin America," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4640, The World Bank.
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    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1831-:d:114739 is not listed on IDEAS

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