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Benefit–Cost Analyses for Security Policies

Editor

Listed:
  • Carol Mansfield
  • V. K. Smith

Abstract

Benefit–Cost Analyses for Security Policies describes how to undertake the evaluation of security policies within the framework of benefit–cost analysis and offers a unique contribution to analysis of homeland security regulations in the United States. The authors outline how established procedures for benefit–cost analysis must adapt to meet challenges posed by current security policy, through examining specific security related regulations. The logic of risk assessment, selection of a discount rate, valuation of travellers’ time when delayed due to screening, valuation of changes in risks of injury or death, and impacts of terrorist events on the economy as a whole are among the issues discussed. An outline of the research and policy evaluation steps needed to build robust benefit–cost methods to evaluate security related regulations in the future is presented in the book.

Individual chapters are listed in the "Chapters" tab

Suggested Citation

  • Carol Mansfield & V. K. Smith (ed.), 2015. "Benefit–Cost Analyses for Security Policies," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 16106, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:16106
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. José G. Montalvo, 2011. "Voting after the Bombings: A Natural Experiment on the Effect of Terrorist Attacks on Democratic Elections," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1146-1154, November.
    2. Glenn W. Harrison & John A. List, 2004. "Field Experiments," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1009-1055, December.
    3. Glenn W. Harrison & Morten I. Lau & E. Elisabet Rutström, 2007. "Estimating Risk Attitudes in Denmark: A Field Experiment," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 109(2), pages 341-368, June.
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    5. Carbone, Jared C. & Kerry Smith, V., 2013. "Valuing nature in a general equilibrium," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 72-89.
    6. Carbone, Jared C. & Smith, V. Kerry, 2008. "Evaluating policy interventions with general equilibrium externalities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1254-1274, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Book Chapters

    The following chapters of this book are listed in IDEAS

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