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Urban adaptation to low-probability shocks: contrasting terrorism and natural disaster risk

In: Benefit–Cost Analyses for Security Policies

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  • Matthew E. Kahn

Abstract

Benefit–Cost Analyses for Security Policies describes how to undertake the evaluation of security policies within the framework of benefit–cost analysis and offers a unique contribution to analysis of homeland security regulations in the United States. The authors outline how established procedures for benefit–cost analysis must adapt to meet challenges posed by current security policy, through examining specific security related regulations. The logic of risk assessment, selection of a discount rate, valuation of travellers’ time when delayed due to screening, valuation of changes in risks of injury or death, and impacts of terrorist events on the economy as a whole are among the issues discussed. An outline of the research and policy evaluation steps needed to build robust benefit-cost methods to evaluate security related regulations in the future is presented in the book.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew E. Kahn, 2015. "Urban adaptation to low-probability shocks: contrasting terrorism and natural disaster risk," Chapters,in: Benefit–Cost Analyses for Security Policies, chapter 7, pages 157-171 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:16106_7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Climate Change Risk vs. Terrorism Risk
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-07-23 20:06:00
    2. Adapting to Urban Terror Risk vs. Urban Climate Change Risk
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-03-25 23:09:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Kahn, Matthew E., 2015. "Climate Change Adaptation: Lessons from Urban Economics," Strategic Behavior and the Environment, now publishers, vol. 5(1), pages 1-30, June.

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