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Issues in the estimation of dynamic happiness models: A comment on "Does childhood predict adult life satisfaction?"

Author

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  • Piper, Alan T.
  • Pugh, Geoffrey T.

Abstract

This paper offers methodological comments on a recent (November 2014) Economic Journal article. The comments consider its use of a dynamic model - the inclusion of a lagged dependent variable - and its approach to estimation. By way of critique, the authors highlight general issues regarding dynamic panel analysis that are still less fully appreciated in the economics of happiness literature than elsewhere in economics and other quantitative social sciences. This discussion of methodological issues arising from dynamic estimation may be of practical assistance to researchers new to the field and/or to dynamic modelling.

Suggested Citation

  • Piper, Alan T. & Pugh, Geoffrey T., 2016. "Issues in the estimation of dynamic happiness models: A comment on "Does childhood predict adult life satisfaction?"," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 10, pages 1-6.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifweej:20165
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.5018/economics-ejournal.ja.2016-5
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/126571/1/847086860.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard Layard & Andrew E. Clark & Francesca Cornaglia & Nattavudh Powdthavee & James Vernoit, 2014. "What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life‐course Model of Well‐being," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(580), pages 720-738, November.
    2. Michael A. Clemens & Steven Radelet & Rikhil Bhavnani, 2004. "Counting chickens when they hatch: The short-term effect of aid on growth," International Finance 0407010, EconWPA.
    3. Paul Frijters & David W. Johnston & Michael A. Shields, 2014. "Does Childhood Predict Adult Life Satisfaction? Evidence from British Cohort Surveys," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(580), pages 688-719, November.
    4. repec:hal:journl:halshs-01109062 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    life Satisfaction; dynamic panel analysis; GMM;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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