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A game theoretical study of generalized trust and reciprocation in Poland: I. Theory and experimental design

Listed author(s):
  • Urszula Markowska-Przybyla

    ()

  • David Ramsey

    ()

Registered author(s):

    Although studies using experimental game theory have been carried out in various countries, no such major study has occurred in Poland. The study described here aims to investigate generalized trust and reciprocation among Polish students. In the literature, these traits are seen to be positively correlated with economic growth. Poland is regarded as the most successful post-soviet bloc country in transforming to a market economy, but the level of generalized trust compared to other post-communist countries is reported to be low. This study aims to see to what degree this reported level of generalized trust is visible amongst young Poles via experimental game theory, along with a questionnaire. The three games to be played are described. Bayesian equilibria illustrating behaviour observed in previous studies are derived for two of these games and the experimental procedure is described.

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    File URL: http://orduser.pwr.wroc.pl/DownloadFile.aspx?aid=1121
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    Article provided by Wroclaw University of Technology, Institute of Organization and Management in its journal Operations Research and Decisions.

    Volume (Year): 3 (2014)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages: 59-76

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    Handle: RePEc:wut:journl:v:3:y:2014:p:59-76:id:1121
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