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Patterns of childhood poverty: New challenges for policy

Author

Listed:
  • Karl Ashworth

    (Professor of Social Policy Research and Director and Research Fellow at the Centre for Research in Social Policy, Loughborough University of Technology, United Kingdom)

  • Martha Hill

    (Senior Study Director at the Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan)

  • Robert Walker

    (Professor of Social Policy Research and Director and Research Fellow at the Centre for Research in Social Policy, Loughborough University of Technology, United Kingdom)

Abstract

Poverty takes many forms. Using data from the U.S. Panel Study of Income Dynamics, this article (1) distinguishes different kinds of childhood poverty, defined in terms of the spacing, severity, and duration of spells; and (2) establishes the extent and distribution of childhood poverty, employing new measures that take into account both duration and severity. Some strategies for targeting assistance on particular forms of poverty are briefly considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Karl Ashworth & Martha Hill & Robert Walker, 1994. "Patterns of childhood poverty: New challenges for policy," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(4), pages 658-680.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:13:y:1994:i:4:p:658-680
    DOI: 10.2307/3325492
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/3325492
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David T. Ellwood & Thomas J. Kane, 1989. "The American Way of Aging: An Event History Analysis," NBER Working Papers 2892, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Mary Corcoran & Roger Gordon & Deborah Laren & Gary Solon, 1992. "The Association between Men's Economic Status and Their Family and Community Origins," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(4), pages 575-601.
    3. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe & James Spaulding, 1991. "Childhood events and circumstances influencing high school completion," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 28(1), pages 133-157, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Micklewright, John, 2002. "Social exclusion and children: a European view for a US debate," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6430, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Peter Gottschalk & Sheldon Danziger, 1999. "Income Mobility and Exits from Poverty of American Children, 1970-1992," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 430, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 15 Feb 2001.
    3. Michael J. Shanahan & Adam Davey & Jennifer Brooks, 1998. "Dynamic Models of Poverty and Psychosocial Adjustment through Childhood," JCPR Working Papers 49, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    4. Yekaterina Chzhen & Emilia Toczydlowska & Sudhanshu Handa & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2016. "Child Poverty Dynamics and Income Mobility in Europe," Papers inwopa840, Innocenti Working Papers.
    5. Anke Schöb, 2001. "Educational Opportunities of Children in Poverty," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 70(1), pages 172-179.
    6. Ann Huff Stevens, 1999. "Climbing out of Poverty, Falling Back in: Measuring the Persistence of Poverty Over Multiple Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(3), pages 557-588.
    7. Tophoven, Silke & Wenzig, Claudia & Lietzmann, Torsten, 2016. "Kinder in Armutslagen : Konzepte, aktuelle Zahlen und Forschungsstand," IAB-Forschungsbericht 201611, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    8. Aue, Katja & Roosen, Jutta & Jensen, Helen H., 2016. "Poverty dynamics in Germany: Evidence on the relationship between persistent poverty and health behavior," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 62-70.
    9. Aue, Katja & Roosen, Jutta, 2010. "Poverty and health behaviour: Comparing socioeconomic status and a combined poverty indicator as a determinant of health behaviour," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116401, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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