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Drink, death, and driving: Do blood alcohol content limit reductions improve road safety?

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  • Benjamin Cooper
  • Markus Gehrsitz
  • Stuart G. McIntyre

Abstract

This study exploits a natural experiment in Scotland where the legal blood alcohol content (BAC) limit was reduced from 0.8 to 0.5 mg per 100 ml of blood while staying constant in all other parts of the United Kingdom. Using a difference‐in‐differences design, we find that this change in the BAC level had no impact on either traffic accident or fatality rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Cooper & Markus Gehrsitz & Stuart G. McIntyre, 2020. "Drink, death, and driving: Do blood alcohol content limit reductions improve road safety?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(7), pages 841-847, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:29:y:2020:i:7:p:841-847
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.4016
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.4016
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Douglas J. Young & Agnieszka Bielinska-Kwapisz, 2006. "Alcohol Prices, Consumption, and Traffic Fatalities," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 690-703, January.
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    5. Grabowski, David C. & Morrisey, Michael A., 2006. "Do higher gasoline taxes save lives?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 51-55, January.
    6. Thomas S Dee, 2001. "Does setting limits save lives? The case of 0.08 BAC laws," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 111-128.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 15th June 2020
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2020-06-15 11:00:19

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