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Estimating the extra cost of living for people with disabilities

Author

Listed:
  • J. Cullinan
  • B. Gannon
  • S. Lyons

Abstract

Addressing the extra economic costs of disability is a logical step towards alleviating elements of social exclusion for people with disabilities. This study estimates the long-run economic cost of disability in Ireland in terms of the additional spending needs that arise due to disability. It defines and estimates models of the private costs borne by families with individuals who have a disability in Ireland when compared with the wider population, both in general and by severity of disability. Our modelling framework is based on the standard of living approach to estimating the cost of disability. We extend on previous research by applying panel ordered probit models to living in Ireland survey data 1995–2001 in order to control for the effects of previous disability and income and correlated unobserved heterogeneity. The approach allows us to quantify, for the first time, the additional long‐run economic costs of living associated with disability. Our findings suggest that the extra economic cost of disability in Ireland is large and varies by severity of disability, with important implications for measures of poverty. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Cullinan & B. Gannon & S. Lyons, 2011. "Estimating the extra cost of living for people with disabilities," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(5), pages 582-599, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:20:y:2011:i:5:p:582-599
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1619
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Cullinan & Brenda Gannon & Eamon O’Shea, 2013. "The welfare implications of disability for older people in Ireland," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 14(2), pages 171-183, April.
    2. Tindara Addabbo & Elena Sarti, 2016. "Access To Work And Disability: The Case Of Italy," Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali, Vita e Pensiero, Pubblicazioni dell'Universita' Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, vol. 134(3-4), pages 239-256.
    3. Marcello Morciano & Ruth Hancock & Stephen Pudney, 2015. "Disability Costs and Equivalence Scales in the Older Population in Great Britain," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(3), pages 494-514, September.
    4. repec:eee:transa:v:107:y:2018:i:c:p:229-245 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. José-Ignacio Antón & Francisco-Javier Braña & Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo, 2016. "An analysis of the cost of disability across Europe using the standard of living approach," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 281-306, August.
    6. Morciano, Marcello & Hancock, Ruth & Pudney, Stephen, 2012. "Disability costs and equivalence scales in the older population," ISER Working Paper Series 2012-09, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Oznur Ozdamar & Eleftherios Giovanis, 2016. "The Link between Health Condition Costs and Standard of Living: A Structural Equation Modelling," Working Papers 1060, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 Jan 2016.
    8. repec:esr:resser:bkmnext328 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Prashant Loyalka & Lan Liu & Gong Chen & Xiaoying Zheng, 2014. "The Cost of Disability in China," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(1), pages 97-118, February.
    10. Tindara Addabbo & Elena Sarti, 2014. "Access to work and disability: the case of Italy," Department of Economics 0038, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    11. Mitra, Sophie & Posarac, Aleksandra & Vick, Brandon, 2011. "Disability and poverty in developing countries : a snapshot from the world health survey," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 62564, The World Bank.
    12. Howley, P., 2016. "Valuing the benefits from health care interventions using life satisfaction data," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/01, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    13. Zantomio, Francesca, 2013. "Older people's participation in extra-cost disability benefits," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 320-330.
    14. Watson, Dorothy & Banks, Joanne & Lyons, Seán, 2015. "Educational and Employment Experiences of People with a Disability in Ireland: An Analysis of the National Disability Survey," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS41.

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