IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/hlthec/v15y2006i9p875-892.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Drug compliance, co-payment and health outcomes: evidence from a panel of Italian patients

Author

Listed:
  • Vincenzo Atella

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome, Italy)

  • Franco Peracchi

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome, Italy)

  • Domenico Depalo

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome, Italy)

  • Claudio Rossetti

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome, Italy)

Abstract

This paper studies the relationship between medical compliance and health outcomes - hospitalization and mortality rates - using a large panel of patients residing in a local health authority in Italy. These data allow us to follow individual patients through all their accesses to public health care services until they either die or leave the local health authority. We adopt a disease specific approach, concentrating on hypertensive patients treated with ACE-inhibitors. Our results show that medical compliance has a clear effect on both hospitalization and mortality rates: health outcomes clearly improve when patients become more compliant to drug therapy. At the same time, we are able to infer valuable information on the role that drug co-payment can have on compliance, and as a consequence on health outcomes, by exploiting the presence of two natural experiments during the period of analysis. Our results show that drug co-payment has a strong effect on compliance, and that this effect is immediate. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Vincenzo Atella & Franco Peracchi & Domenico Depalo & Claudio Rossetti, 2006. "Drug compliance, co-payment and health outcomes: evidence from a panel of Italian patients," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(9), pages 875-892.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:15:y:2006:i:9:p:875-892
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1135
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1135
    File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alan, Sule & Crossley, Thomas F. & Grootendorst, Paul & Veall, Michael R., 2002. "The effects of drug subsidies on out-of-pocket prescription drug expenditures by seniors: regional evidence from Canada," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 805-826, September.
    2. Vincenzo Atella & Peter R. Noyce & Ellen Schafheutle & Karen Hassell, 2005. "Affordability of Medicines and Patients' Cost Reduction Behaviors: Empirical Evidence Based on SUR Estimates from Italy and the United Kingdom," CEIS Research Paper 71, Tor Vergata University, CEIS.
    3. Lundberg, Lena & Johannesson, Magnus & Isacson, Dag G. L. & Borgquist, Lars, 1998. "Effects of user charges on the use of prescription medicines in different socio-economic groups," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 123-134, May.
    4. Anne Case & Ingrid Le Roux & Alicia Menendez, 2004. "Medical Compliance and Income-Health Gradients," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 331-335, May.
    5. Leibowitz, Arleen & Manning, Willard G. & Newhouse, Joseph P., 1985. "The demand for prescription drugs as a function of cost-sharing," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 21(10), pages 1063-1069, January.
    6. Sule Alan & Thomas F. Crossley & Paul Grootendorst & Michael R. Veall, 2002. "Out-of-Pocket Prescription Drug Expenditures and Public Prescription Drug Programs," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 88, McMaster University.
    7. Stéphane Jacobzone, 2000. "Pharmaceutical Policies in OECD Countries: Reconciling Social and Industrial Goals," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 40, OECD Publishing.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Fiorio, Carlo V. & Siciliani, Luigi, 2010. "Co-payments and the demand for pharmaceuticals: Evidence from Italy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 835-841, July.
    2. Petra Baji & Milena Pavlova & László Gulácsi & Miklós Farkas & Wim Groot, 2014. "The link between past informal payments and willingness of the Hungarian population to pay formal fees for health care services: results from a contingent valuation study," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(8), pages 853-867, November.
    3. Vincenzo Atella & Francesco D'Amico, 2010. "Who is responsible for your health: You, your doctor or new technologies?," CEIS Research Paper 167, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 28 May 2010.
    4. Astrid Kiil & Kurt Houlberg, 2014. "How does copayment for health care services affect demand, health and redistribution? A systematic review of the empirical evidence from 1990 to 2011," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(8), pages 813-828, November.
    5. Vincenzo Atella & Joanna Kopinska, 2012. "The impact of cost sharing schemes on drug compliance: evidence based on quantile regression," CEIS Research Paper 247, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 27 Jul 2012.
    6. Mas, Nuria & Cirera, Laia & Viñolas, Guillem, 2011. "Los sistemas de copago en Europa, Estados Unidos y Canadá: Implicaciones para el caso español," IESE Research Papers D/939, IESE Business School.
    7. Jones, A.M, 2010. "Models For Health Care," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/01, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    8. Gourzoulidis, George & Kourlaba, Georgia & Stafylas, Panagiotis & Giamouzis, Gregory & Parissis, John & Maniadakis, Nikolaos, 2017. "Association between copayment, medication adherence and outcomes in the management of patients with diabetes and heart failure," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 121(4), pages 363-377.
    9. Vincenzo Atella & Joanna Kopinska, 2014. "The impact of cost-sharing schemes on drug compliance in Italy: evidence based on quantile regression," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 59(2), pages 329-339, April.
    10. Panagiotis Petrou, 2015. "An Interrupted Time-Series Analysis to Assess Impact of Introduction of Co-Payment on Emergency Room Visits in Cyprus," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 13(5), pages 515-523, October.
    11. Jaume Puig-Junoy & Pilar Garcia-Gomez & David Casado-Marin, 2011. "Free Medicines thanks to Retirement: Moral Hazard and Hospitalization Offsets in an NHS," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-108/3, Tinbergen Institute.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:15:y:2006:i:9:p:875-892. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.