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The reconfiguration of post-Soviet food industries: Evidence from Ukraine and Moldova

  • Matthew Gorton

    (School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, University of Newcastle, UK. E-mail: matthew.gorton@ncl.ac.uk)

  • John White

    (Department of International Business, Plymouth Business School, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon, PL4 8AA, UK., E-mail: John.White@pbs.plym.ac.uk)

  • Svetlana Chernyshova

    (Dnepropetrovsk Academy of Management, Business and Law, Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine. E-mail: sbml@ukr.net)

  • Alexander Skripnik

    (Dnepropetrovsk Academy of Management, Business and Law, Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine. E-mail: askripnik@fm.ua)

  • Tatiana Vinichenko

    (Dnepropetrovsk Academy of Management, Business and Law, Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine. E-mail: sbml@ukr.net)

  • Mikhail Dumitrasco

    (Institute of Management and Rural Development, Chisinãu, Moldova., E-mail: midr@mdl.net)

  • Galina Soltan

    (Institute of Management and Rural Development, Chisinãu, Moldova., E-mail: midr@mdl.net)

The 1990s witnessed widespread changes in the nature of food supply chain actors, government policies, and markets in the successor states of the Soviet Union. These changes have resulted in a more differentiated set of actors, but there is relatively little empirical knowledge on the reconfiguration of food processors and their relationships with agricultural processors. This article attempts to deal with this gap by researching structures and procurement relationships in the Ukraine and Moldova. Enterprise level survey data on the food-processing sector in Moldova and the Ukraine reveals a diverse set of actors. Cluster analysis is employed to better characterize these different groups of processors. A three-cluster solution is adopted, and the main characteristics, supply patterns, and dynamics of each cluster are further analyzed. [EconLit citations: L660, L100]. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Agribusiness 19: 409-424, 2003.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/agr.10076
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Agribusiness.

Volume (Year): 19 (2003)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 409-424

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Handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:19:y:2003:i:4:p:409-424
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1520-6297

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  1. Rachel Murphy, 1999. "Return migrant entrepreneurs and economic diversification in two counties in south Jiangxi, China," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(4), pages 661-672.
  2. W. Bruce Traill & Matthew Meulenberg, 2001. "Innovation in the food industry," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 1-21.
  3. Estrin, Saul & Rosevear, Adam, 1999. "Enterprise performance and ownership: The case of Ukraine," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 1125-1136, April.
  4. Gloy, Brent A. & Akridge, Jay T., 1999. "Segmenting The Commercial Producer Marketplace For Agricultural Inputs," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 2(02).
  5. Gloy, Brent A. & Akridge, Jay T., 1999. "Segmenting The Commercial Producer Market For Agricultural Inputs," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21592, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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