IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/vrs/suvges/v30y2020i4p24-54n2.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Ease of Doing Business and Capital Market Development in a Demand Following Hypothesis: Evidence from ECOWAS

Author

Listed:
  • Nageri Kamaldeen Ibraheem

    (Department of Banking and Finance, Al-Hikmah University, Ilorin, Nigeria)

Abstract

Capabilities of African businesses in a transformative role in solving the continent‘s challenges are underestimated and misunderstood. This study examined ease of doing business and financial development from a demand following hypothesis in the West African sub-region, employed Structural Equation Model covering the period of 2004 - 2017. Ten ease of doing business indicators and five distinct financial (capital market) development variables from the World Bank database were used. Findings indicate weak demand following the hypothesis of capital market development: positive and negative, depending on the measure of capital market development from the ease of doing business for West African countries majorly because of inadequate electricity. The indirect effect of the construction permit, property registration, access to credit, minority investors‘ protection and cross-border trading are indirectly significant to capital market development while starting a business, tax-paying, contract enforcement and settling insolvency are insignificant. The study recommended roadshow by West African capital markets to improve the listing of companies and the government should improve on the electricity supply.

Suggested Citation

  • Nageri Kamaldeen Ibraheem, 2020. "Ease of Doing Business and Capital Market Development in a Demand Following Hypothesis: Evidence from ECOWAS," Studia Universitatis „Vasile Goldis” Arad – Economics Series, Sciendo, vol. 30(4), pages 24-54, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:vrs:suvges:v:30:y:2020:i:4:p:24-54:n:2
    DOI: 10.2478/sues-2020-0023
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.2478/sues-2020-0023
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.2478/sues-2020-0023?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "Challenges of Doing Business in Africa: A Systematic Review," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 259-268, April.
    2. Djankov, Simeon & McLiesh, Caralee & Shleifer, Andrei, 2007. "Private credit in 129 countries," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 299-329, May.
    3. Vanessa Simen Tchamyou, 2017. "The Role of Knowledge Economy in African Business," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(4), pages 1189-1228, December.
    4. Simplice A. Asongu, 2015. "Finance and growth: new evidence from meta-analysis," Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 41(6), pages 615-639, June.
    5. Klapper, Leora & Laeven, Luc & Rajan, Raghuram, 2006. "Entry regulation as a barrier to entrepreneurship," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(3), pages 591-629, December.
    6. Junyon Im & Sunny Sun, 2015. "Profits and outreach to the poor: The institutional logics of microfinance institutions," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 95-117, March.
    7. Adrian Corcoran & Robert Gillanders, 2015. "Foreign direct investment and the ease of doing business," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 151(1), pages 103-126, February.
    8. Demirguc-Kunt, Ash & Levine, Ross, 1996. "Stock Market Development and Financial Intermediaries: Stylized Facts," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(2), pages 291-321, May.
    9. Simplice A. Asongu, 2017. "Knowledge Economy Gaps, Policy Syndromes, and Catch-Up Strategies: Fresh South Korean Lessons to Africa," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(1), pages 211-253, March.
    10. Chee Keong Choong & Zulkornain Yusop & Siong Hook Law & Venus Liew Khim Sen, 2003. "Financial Development and Economic Growth in Malaysia: The Stock Market Perspective," Macroeconomics 0307010, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
    12. Demirguc-Kunt, Ash & Maksimovic, Vojislav, 1996. "Stock Market Development and Financing Choices of Firms," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(2), pages 341-369, May.
    13. Gerard George & Rekha Rao-Nicholson & Christopher Corbishley & Rahul Bansal, 2015. "Institutional entrepreneurship, governance, and poverty: Insights from emergency medical response servicesin India," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 39-65, March.
    14. Kofi A. Osei, 2002. "Asset pricing and information efficiency of the Ghana Stock Market," Working Papers 115, African Economic Research Consortium, Research Department.
    15. Erkko Autio & Kun Fu, 2015. "Economic and political institutions and entry into formal and informal entrepreneurship," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 67-94, March.
    16. David Kelsey & Sara le Roux, 2018. "Strategic ambiguity and decision-making: an experimental study," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 84(3), pages 387-404, May.
    17. Chow, Sheung Chi & Vieito, João Paulo & Wong, Wing Keung, 2019. "Do both demand-following and supply-leading theories hold true in developing countries?," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 513(C), pages 536-554.
    18. Adu-Gyamfi, Richard & Kuada, John & Asongu, Simplice, 2018. "An Integrative Framework for Entrepreneurship Research in Africa," MPRA Paper 89133, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Miriam Bruhn, 2011. "License to Sell: The Effect of Business Registration Reform on Entrepreneurial Activity in Mexico," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(1), pages 382-386, February.
    20. Levon Barseghyan, 2008. "Entry costs and cross-country differences in productivity and output," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 145-167, June.
    21. Borlea Sorin Nicolae & Puscas Adriana & Mare Codruta & Achim Monica Violeta, 2016. "Direction of Causality Between Financial Development and Economic Growth. Evidence for Developing Countries," Studia Universitatis „Vasile Goldis” Arad – Economics Series, Sciendo, vol. 26(2), pages 1-22, June.
    22. Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1986. "Large Shareholders and Corporate Control," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages 461-488, June.
    23. Christopoulos, Dimitris K. & Tsionas, Efthymios G., 2004. "Financial development and economic growth: evidence from panel unit root and cointegration tests," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 55-74, February.
    24. Bekaert, Geert, 1995. "Market Integration and Investment Barriers in Emerging Equity Markets," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 9(1), pages 75-107, January.
    25. Era Dabla-Norris & Erasmus K. Kersting & Geneviève Verdier, 2012. "Firm Productivity, Innovation, and Financial Development," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 79(2), pages 422-449, October.
    26. Djankov, Simeon & McLiesh, Caralee & Ramalho, Rita Maria, 2006. "Regulation and growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 92(3), pages 395-401, September.
    27. von Furstenberg, George M. & Fratianni, Michele, 1996. "Indicators of financial development," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 19-29.
    28. Charles Amo Yartey & Charles Komla Adjasi, 2007. "Stock Market Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: Critical Issues and Challenges," IMF Working Papers 2007/209, International Monetary Fund.
    29. Valeriano F. García & Lin Liu, 1999. "Macroeconomic Determinants of Stock Market Development," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 2, pages 29-59, May.
    30. Mlambo, Chipo & Biekpe, Nicholas, 2003. "The consequences of online information dissemination on stock market liquidity and efficiency: Implications on African markets," MPRA Paper 24971, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2003.
    31. Sharon Alvarez & Jay Barney & Arielle Newman, 2015. "The poverty problem and the industrialization solution," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 23-37, March.
    32. Clement Nangpiire & Ricardo Gouveia Rodrigues & Ibrahim Osman Adam, 2018. "Ease of doing business and foreign direct investment inflow among Sub-Sahara African countries," International Journal of Business and Emerging Markets, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 10(3), pages 289-303.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "Challenges of Doing Business in Africa: A Systematic Review," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 259-268, April.
    2. Adu-Gyamfi, Richard & Kuada, John & Asongu, Simplice, 2018. "An Integrative Framework for Entrepreneurship Research in Africa," MPRA Paper 89133, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Asongu, Simplice & Tchamyou, Vanessa, 2015. "The Impact of Entrepreneurship on Knowledge Economy in Africa," MPRA Paper 70237, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Aug 2015.
    4. Mendoza, Ronald U. & Canare, Tristan A. & Ang, Alvin, 2015. "Doing Business: A Review of Literature and Its Role in APEC 2015," Research Paper Series DP 2015-37, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    5. Mendoza, Ronald U. & Canare, Tristan A. & Ang, Alvin, 2015. "Doing Business: A Review of Literature and Its Role in APEC 2015," Discussion Papers DP 2015-37, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    6. S. Nyasha & N. M. Odhiambo, 2016. "The Impact of Bank-Based and Market-Based Financial Development on Economic Growth: Time-Series Evidence From the United Kingdom," Global Economy Journal (GEJ), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 389-410, June.
    7. Cheng, Su-Yin, 2012. "Substitution or complementary effects between banking and stock markets: Evidence from financial openness in Taiwan," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 508-520.
    8. Asongu, Simplice A. & Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2020. "Foreign direct investment, information technology and economic growth dynamics in Sub-Saharan Africa," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1).
    9. Bekaert, Geert & Harvey, Campbell R. & Lundblad, Christian, 2005. "Does financial liberalization spur growth?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 3-55, July.
    10. Christie Dike, 2016. "Stock Market Efficiency Promotes Economic Development: Empirical Evidence from Africa," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 1287-1298.
    11. Adrian Corcoran & Robert Gillanders, 2015. "Foreign direct investment and the ease of doing business," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 151(1), pages 103-126, February.
    12. Naser I Abumustafa, 2016. "Investigating the Arab stock markets during Arab spring," Journal of Asset Management, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 17(5), pages 313-318, September.
    13. Lee Branstetter & Francisco Lima & Lowell J. Taylor & Ana Venâncio, 2014. "Do Entry Regulations Deter Entrepreneurship and Job Creation? Evidence from Recent Reforms in Portugal," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(577), pages 805-832, June.
    14. Sheilla Nyasha & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2016. "Financial Systems and Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence from Australia," Contemporary Economics, University of Economics and Human Sciences in Warsaw., vol. 10(2), June.
    15. Christopher A. Hartwell, 2014. "Do (successful) stock exchanges support or hinder institutions in transition economies?," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 1-18, December.
    16. Sheilla Nyasha & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2015. "The Impact of Banks and Stock Market Development on Economic Growth in South Africa: an ARDL-bounds Testing Approach," Contemporary Economics, University of Economics and Human Sciences in Warsaw., vol. 9(1), March.
    17. Djankov, Simeon, 2008. "The Regulation of Entry: A Survey," CEPR Discussion Papers 7080, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    18. Antonio Ciccone & Elias Papaioannou, 2008. "Entry regulation and intersectoral reallocation," Economics Working Papers 1353, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    19. World Bank & International Finance Corporation, 2013. "Doing Business 2014 : Understanding Regulations for Small and Medium-Size Enterprises," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 16204, December.
    20. Rudra P. Pradhan & Mak B. Arvin & John H. Hall & Sahar Bahmani, 2014. "Causal nexus between economic growth, banking sector development, stock market development, and other macroeconomic variables: The case of ASEAN countries," Review of Financial Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 23(4), pages 155-173, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Doing business; financial development; demand following; SEM; ECOWAS;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:vrs:suvges:v:30:y:2020:i:4:p:24-54:n:2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://www.sciendo.com/services/journals .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Peter Golla (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.sciendo.com/services/journals .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.