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Divorce, Remarriage, and Child Support

  • Pierre-André Chiappori
  • Yoram Weiss

There is some evidence that children of divorced parents do not perform as well as comparable children in intact families but that this gap declines with the aggregate divorce rate. We develop a model in which the higher expectations for remarriage associated with higher divorce rates can trigger an equilibrium in which divorced fathers make more generous transfers that benefit their children and the mother in the aftermath of divorce. As a result, the welfare loss of children from the separation of their parents can be lower when divorce and remarriage rates rise.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/508731
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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2007)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 37-74

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:25:y:2007:p:37-74
DOI: 10.1086/508731
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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  1. Daniela Del Boca, 2003. "Mothers, fathers and children after divorce: The role of institutions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(3), pages 399-422, 08.
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  8. repec:pri:cheawb:case_child_support is not listed on IDEAS
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  10. Anne C. Case & I-Fen Lin & Sara S. McLanahan, 2003. "Explaining Trends In Child Support: Economic, Demographic, And Policy Effects," Working Papers 259, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
  11. Ken Burdett & Randall Wright, 1998. "Two-Sided Search with Nontransferable Utility," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(1), pages 220-245, January.
  12. P. Diamond & E. Makin, 1979. "An Equilibrium Analysis of Search and Breach of Contract, II: A Non-Steady State Example," Working papers 237, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  13. Dora L. Costa & Matthew E. Kahn, 2000. "Power Couples: Changes in the Locational Choice of the College Educated, 1940–1990," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1287-1315.
  14. Ishida, Junichiro, 2003. "The role of social norms in a model of marriage and divorce," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 131-142, May.
  15. Alberto Bisin & Giorgio Topa & Thierry Verdier, 2004. "Religious Intermarriage and Socialization in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(3), pages 615-664, June.
  16. Peter A. Diamond & Eric Maskin, 1979. "An Equilibrium Analysis of Search and Breach of Contract, I: Steady States," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(1), pages 282-316, Spring.
  17. Weiss, Yoram & Willis, Robert J, 1985. "Children as Collective Goods and Divorce Settlements," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(3), pages 268-92, July.
  18. Richard Breen & Cecilia Garcia-Penalosa, 2002. "Bayesian Learning and Gender Segregation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(4), pages 899-922, October.
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