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How Do the US and Canadian Social Safety Nets Compare for Women and Children?

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  • Hilary Hoynes
  • Mark Stabile

Abstract

The past quarter-century has seen substantial change in the social safety nets for families with children in the United States and Canada. Both countries have moved away from cash welfare, but the United States has relied more on work requirements. We examine the implications for the employment and poverty of low-educated single mothers. We find that employment improved substantially in both countries, absolutely and relative to a control group of single women without children. Poverty rates also declined in both countries, with more of the decline coming through market income in the United States and benefit income in Canada.

Suggested Citation

  • Hilary Hoynes & Mark Stabile, 2019. "How Do the US and Canadian Social Safety Nets Compare for Women and Children?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(S2), pages 253-288.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/703260
    DOI: 10.1086/703260
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Emmanuel Okewu & Sanjay Misra & Jonathan Okewu & Robertas Damaševičius & Rytis Maskeliūnas, 2019. "An Intelligent Advisory System to Support Managerial Decisions for A Social Safety Net," Administrative Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(3), pages 1-1, August.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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