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Low Pay, Higher Pay and Job Satisfaction in Wales

Author

Listed:
  • Richard Jones
  • Peter Sloane

Abstract

Abstract Using the first six waves of the Welsh boosts to the British Household Panel Survey this paper attempts to explain the determinants of overall job satisfaction and four facets of job satisfaction in Wales, distinguishing between female and male workers and low-paid and higher paid workers. The motivation of the paper is the claim made widely in the EU that low-paid jobs are jobs of inherently low quality, in which case we should expect that job satisfaction would be lower in low-paid jobs. Since there are proportionately more low-paid workers in Wales than in either England or Scotland we would also expect to find that job satisfaction would be lower in Wales than in the other two countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Jones & Peter Sloane, 2007. "Low Pay, Higher Pay and Job Satisfaction in Wales," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2), pages 197-214.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:specan:v:2:y:2007:i:2:p:197-214
    DOI: 10.1080/17421770701348198
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Luis Diaz-Serrano & Jose A. Cabral Vieira, 2005. "Low-pay higher pay and job satisfaction within the European Union: empirical evidence from fourteen countries," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n1560405, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Konstantinos Pouliakas & Ioannis Theodossiou, 2005. "Socio-Economic Differences in the Perceived Quality of High and Low-Paid Jobs in Europe," Labor and Demography 0506002, EconWPA.
    2. Dr Marwan T. Al-Zoubi, 2012. "The Shape Of The Relationship Between Salary And Job Satisfaction: A Field Study," Far East Journal of Psychology and Business, Far East Research Centre, vol. 7(1), pages 1-12, June.
    3. Diaz-Serrano, Luis & Vieira, José António Cabral, 2005. "Low Pay, Higher Pay and Job Satisfaction within the European Union: Empirical Evidence from Fourteen Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 1558, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Theodossiou, Ioannis, 2005. "Socio-Economic Differences in the Satisfaction of High-Pay and Low-Pay Jobs in Europe," MPRA Paper 16733, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Aug 2009.
    5. Ricardo Pagán-Rodríguez, 2015. "Disability, Training and Job Satisfaction," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(3), pages 865-885, July.
    6. Ricardo Pagán & Miguel Malo, 2009. "Job satisfaction and disability: lower expectations about jobs or a matter of health?," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 11(1), pages 51-74, March.
    7. Jose Cabral Vieira & Antonio Menezes & Patricia Gabriel, 2005. "Low pay, higher pay and job quality: empirical evidence for Portugal," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(8), pages 505-511.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pay; job satisfaction; Wales; J0; J3; J4;

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J4 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets

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