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Wealth and saving in New Zealand: evidence from the longitudinal survey of family, income and employment

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  • Trinh Le
  • John Gibson
  • Steven Stillman

Abstract

This paper uses data from the Survey of Family, Income and Employment to estimate saving by the household sector in New Zealand during 2004--2006. Even our most conservative estimate is that at least 14% of gross income was saved during this period. By contrast, the indirectly derived Household Income and Outlay Accounts indicate (net) household saving was −12.5% per year over the same period. We also find no evidence that capital gains in housing during this time period crowded out saving or that the composition of household wealth in New Zealand differed from that in other developed countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Trinh Le & John Gibson & Steven Stillman, 2012. "Wealth and saving in New Zealand: evidence from the longitudinal survey of family, income and employment," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 93-118, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:46:y:2012:i:2:p:93-118
    DOI: 10.1080/00779954.2011.641935
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Law & Lisa Meehan, 2013. "Housing Affordability in New Zealand: Evidence from Household Surveys," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/14, New Zealand Treasury.
    2. Littlewood, Michael, 2014. "Ageing populations, retirement incomes and public policy: what really matters," MPRA Paper 56232, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Ramiz Rahmanov, 2015. "Banking Sector Development and Household Saving in Emerging Eastern Europe," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1089, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    4. Rob Hodgson & Jacques Poot, 2011. "New Zealand Research on the Economic Impacts of Immigration 2005-2010: Synthesis and Research Agenda," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1104, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    5. David Law & Grant M Scobie, 2014. "KiwiSaver and the Accumulation of Net Wealth," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/22, New Zealand Treasury.

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