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Housing Affordability in New Zealand: Evidence from Household Surveys




Housing affordability has been a topic of much interest in New Zealand over recent years with the median house price increasing by over 50% between 2004 and 2008. The aim of this paper is to inform debate by drawing out evidence from two surveys: the Household Economic Survey (HES); and the Survey of Family, Income and Employment (SoFIE). In particular, the paper examines how patterns of house prices, expenditures, and home ownership have changed over time and across groups. A model which may be suggestive of whether or not an individual or couple is likely to find home-ownership affordable is also developed. This model incorporates information relating to four important influences of affordability: income; net wealth; house prices; and the structure of mortgage contracts (including the interest rate and mortgage term).

Suggested Citation

  • David Law & Lisa Meehan, 2013. "Housing Affordability in New Zealand: Evidence from Household Surveys," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/14, New Zealand Treasury.
  • Handle: RePEc:nzt:nztwps:13/14

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. repec:taf:regstd:v:46:y:2012:i:2:p:93-118 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Stanley Fischer & Franco Modigliani, 1978. "Towards an understanding of the real effects and costs of inflation," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 114(4), pages 810-833, December.
    3. Trinh Le & John Gibson & Steven Stillman, 2012. "Wealth and saving in New Zealand: evidence from the longitudinal survey of family, income and employment," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 93-118, November.
    4. Grant Scobie & Trinh Le & John Gibson, 2007. "Housing in the Household Portfolio and Implications for Retirement Saving: Some Initial Finding from SOFIE," Treasury Working Paper Series 07/04, New Zealand Treasury.
    5. DiPasquale, Denise & Glaeser, Edward L., 1999. "Incentives and Social Capital: Are Homeowners Better Citizens?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 354-384, March.
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    More about this item


    Housing Affordability; House Prices; Homeownership; Housing Expenditures; Rent; Mortgage Payments;

    JEL classification:

    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets
    • R32 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Other Spatial Production and Pricing Analysis

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