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The role of ideology in disagreements among economists: a quantitative analysis

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  • Thomas Mayer

Abstract

How justified is the charge that ideology strongly influences the allegedly objective opinions of economists? An analysis of a new survey of AEA members and of surveys of labour economists and public economists shows that value judgments and judgments about the government's efficacy have some influence on the way economists think about what should be purely economic issues. But such influence is not strong enough to explain much of the disagreement among economists.

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  • Thomas Mayer, 2001. "The role of ideology in disagreements among economists: a quantitative analysis," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 253-273.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jecmet:v:8:y:2001:i:2:p:253-273
    DOI: 10.1080/13501780110047309
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Henry Woo, 1994. "Three images of economics and its progress," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 57-64.
    2. Thomas Mayer, 1994. "Why is there so much disagreement among economists?," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 1-14.
    3. Thomas Mayer, "undated". "Monetarists And Keynesians On Central Banking: A Study Of A Failed Debate," Department of Economics 96-06, California Davis - Department of Economics.
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    6. Roger Backhouse, 1994. "The fixation of economic beliefs," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 33-42.
    7. David Colander, 2018. "Vision, judgment, and disagreement among economists," Chapters,in: How Economics Should Be Done, chapter 2, pages 11-24 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Franco Modigliani, 1977. "The monetarist controversy; or, should we forsake stabilization policies?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Spr suppl, pages 27-46.
    9. Alston, Richard M & Kearl, J R & Vaughan, Michael B, 1992. "Is There a Consensus among Economists in the 1990's?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 203-209, May.
    10. Donald McCloskey, 1994. "How economists persuade," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 15-32.
    11. Frey, Bruno S & Eichenberger, Reiner, 1992. "Economics and Economists: A European Perspective," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 216-220, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Potrafke, Niklas, 2013. "Minority positions in the German Council of Economic Experts: A political economic analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 180-187.
    2. Thomas Mayer, 2006. "The Empirical Significance of Econometric Models," Working Papers 620, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    3. Frederik Carlsson & Mitesh Kataria & Elina Lampi & M. Vittoria Levati, 2010. "Doing good with other people's money: A charitable giving experiment with students in environmental sciences and economics," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-089, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    4. Kataria, Mitesh, 2012. "The role of preferences in disagreements over scientific hypothesis: Evidence on cognitive bias in formation of beliefs," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 364-369.
    5. Cárdenas, Roberto, 2015. "La no-reforma curricular en Ingeniería Comercial, Universidad de Concepción," Estudios Nueva Economía, Estudios Nueva Economía, vol. 4(1), pages 64-72.
    6. Ha Quyen Ngo & Niklas Potrafke & Marina Riem & Christoph Schinke, 2018. "Ideology and Dissent among Economists: The Joint Economic Forecast of German Economic Research Institutes," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 44(1), pages 135-152, January.
    7. Klaus Mohn, 2010. "Autism in Economics? A Second Opinion," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 39(2), pages 191-208, July.

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